| January, 2016

CRIME WATCH

Posted on 07 January 2016 by LeslieM

Deerfield Beach

Dec. 21: A woman reported that her live-in boyfriend attacked her and squeezed her neck. She used a knife in self-defense but received two lacerations to her hand. The incident was reported at 430 Lock Rd.

Dec. 21: A man who operates Greenworks Landscaping reported that two blowers were stolen from his trailer at 1333 SW 30 Ave.

Dec. 21: UPS Security reported that a package containing five iPads was stolen from 1332 NW 3 Ct.

Dec. 22: A boat trailer was stolen from 2571 W. Hillsboro Blvd.

Jan. 2: Victim delivered a pizza to 2963 S. Waterford Dr. When homeowner opened the door, a dog pushed out the door and bit the victim in the left leg. He received a puncture wound and was treated at the hospital.

Jan. 2: Unknown suspect stole victim’s patio table from open air patio at 540 Deer Creek Jefferson Dr. sometime the previous night.

Jan. 3: Suspect stole $174.71 of clothing from Target at 3599 W. Hillsboro Blvd. He was stopped outside the store by Loss Prevention staff.

Lighthouse Point

Dec. 12: Someone entered an unlocked door of a vehicle parked at 2210 NE 33 St. and stole five $1 bills from a cup holder.

Dec. 14: Someone drove across a lawn at 3711 NE 26 Ave. and damaged five hedges. The loss was $100.

Dec. 15: The victim said she paid $10 for a psychic reader located at 2670 N. Federal Hwy. and was told there were very bad things in her future and she needed a cleansing that would cost $5,000. She withdrew the money and was then told she needed to pay $10,000. She grew suspicious and contacted police.

Remember, if you see anything suspicious, call 911 immediately.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Posted on 07 January 2016 by LeslieM

RE: Code Compliance harassment

Dear Mayor Robb, City Manger Hansen and City Commissioners:

As a resident, General Contractor, homeowner and a part of Deerfield Beach since the early 1970s, I am writing this letter so that the city leaders are aware of the abuse of power, harassment and resentment that the code compliance team [Calvin, Giordano & Associates] is causing in the community with their interpretation and misuse of the codes. They are supposed to help and serve the residents, not create animosity, anger and fear by their SWAT team “sweeps” and their over-the-edge enforcement of code compliance and violations, which is supposed to be at a minimum standard.

Unfortunately, they establish their own minimum standards and write violations in volume because there [is] no established or accepted standard for comparison, and it seems there is very little supervision or control by the city over their activities and abuses.

I called the building department twice (around May/June and then in Nov.) and Norman Bruhn came out both times. He was very helpful and understood my concerns and the seriousness of my neighbor’s structurally damaged seawall. In the 17+ years I lived at this address, I have witnessed two seawalls collapse on the south side of our lagoon, causing lawsuits, thousands of dollars in repair costs, plus a lot of grief, stress and aggravation. Norman said he, or the engineering department would refer this matter to code compliance.

I was hopeful code compliance would help in preventing another seawall disaster (including further damage to my seawall) and would have the owner make the required repairs. I really felt that code compliance would be professional, responsible and help resolve this serious structural seawall problem.

Was I in for a rude surprise! The code compliance team looked at the seawall on Nov. 6 and, between that date and Nov 20, they wrote no less than 28 violations for the eight homes on the southeast side of NE 8 Ave. There are only eight homes on that side of the street on the lagoon, and Bernard Pita’s team wrote violations for every one of them, no matter how petty or frivolous.

Pita said he still has to “sweep” the other side of the street causing more harassment, anger and resentment toward the city.

On Dec. 17, I talked to Assistant City Manager Brian Donavan. First, I want to say that Brian has always been helpful. He is always very professional, honest and nice. He was sympathetic on the poor timing of these violations.

Brian explained that these “sweeps” were in fact standard practices, common and accepted procedures and were done previously by BSO when they supervised code enforcement, even though there is no law, code or ordinance governing them. I would like to know how many sweeps and violations BSO wrote out in their time in Deerfield Beach code enforcement, compared to [Calvin, Giordano & Associates].

I am astonished that the city officials would tolerate and condone these abuses against their citizens. The city should immediately stop and cancel Calvin, Giordano & Associates, contract, rescind all their violations, and reassess code policies and practices.

Frank J. Kenney

Deerfield Beach

[excerpt of letter]

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HAPPENINGS

Posted on 07 January 2016 by LeslieM

Movies in the Park: Planes Fire & Rescue

Friday, Jan. 8, 7 p.m.

Villages of Hillsboro Park

4111 NW 6 St.

Deerfield Beach, FL 33442

Free. Bring a blanket and lawn chairs and enjoy a night at the movies. Snacks and glow items available for purchase.

Little River Band, Ambrosia, Player

Friday, Jan. 8, 7 p.m.

Pompano Beach Amphitheatre “The Amp”

1801 NE 6 St.

Pompano Beach, FL 33060

Three great concerts for the price of one. Enjoy chart topping familiar hits of the late ‘70s to mid-‘80s. $45 – $75 per person. www.theamppompano.org.

3rd Annual Brandon’s Run for Autism

Saturday, Jan. 9, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Quiet Waters Park

401 S. Powerline Rd.

Deerfield Beach, FL 33442

5K event. Top 3 in each division receive medals. Event benefits the International Society for Autism, which fundsresearch, scholarships and job training for those affected by Autism. Entry $25 in advance; $35 at door. 305-305-0540.

Hillsboro Lighthouse tour

Saturday Jan 9, 8:30, 9:15, 10 and 11 a.m.

Alsdorf Park Dock

2974 NE 14 St.

Pompano Beach, FL 33062

Transportation is by boat. Must wear flat, closed shoes. Children must be 4 ft. tall to climb the tower. No pets. $25; free to HLPS members. www.hillsborolighthouse.org/tours.

Pet CPR Course

Saturday, Jan. 9, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Florida Humane Society

3870 N. Powerline Rd.

Pompano Beach, FL 33073

Save your pet in an emergency with CPR and first aid techniques. Please bring an item to donate to Florida Humane Society, such as paper towels, bleach, cat litter. Space limited; register in advance at www.PetTech.net. 954-974-6152. For Pet CPR or human CPR classes, call CPR Training 2 Go, 954-461-8203.

Coast Guard Safe Boating Course

Saturday Jan. 9, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Coast Guard HQ building

Spanish River Park

3939 N. Ocean Blvd.

Boca Raton, FL 33442

Certificate on class completion, plus Florida Boating ID card required for boaters under 26 years. Some insurers give discounts for course completion. Bring lunch. $35 per person. 561-391-3600.

Oshogatsu Festival

Sunday, Jan. 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

4000 Morikami Park Rd.

Delray Beach, FL 33446

Celebrate the Year of the Monkey at the Morikami’s 38th Annual Oshogatsu New Year’s Festival. Experience the tastes, sights and sounds that define the Japanese New Year. More info.: http://morikami.org/cultural-programs/oshogatsu.

Deerfield Beach Orchid Society Meeting

Tuesday, Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m.

Woman’s Club of Deerfield Beach

910 E. Hillsboro Blvd.

Deerfield Beach, FL 33441

Free. Sheldon Takasaki, a well-known breeder of beautiful Hawaiian orchid hybrids and species and owner of Carmela Orchids, Inc. in Hakalau, Hawaii, will be sharing his vast knowledge about orchids. Call 954-464-8996.

Save the Date:

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Birthday Celebration

Friday, Jan. 15 to Monday, Jan. 18, Times TBA

Oveta McKeithen Recreational Complex

445 SW 2 St.

Deerfield Beach, FL 33442

This four-day event features a weekend carnival, games and live entertainment, before drawing to a close on Monday with a 2-mile long parade and awards ceremony.

Cool Wheels Car Show

Sunday, Jan. 17, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Quiet Waters Park, Shelter #10

401 S. Powerline Road

Deerfield Beach, FL 33442

Benefitting the Youth Automotive Training Center. Best in show wins $1,000. Gift bags to first 300 cars. Music, food trucks, raffle, prizes and more. Kustom Kulture artist Ben Mitchell. $20 advance; $25 at gate. www.yatc.com.

18th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon

Wednesday, Jan. 27, 11:30 a.m.

Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club

2701 NE 42 St.

Pompano Beach, FL 33064

Benefits NE Focal Point. $50 per person. 954-480-4460 for tickets and information.

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CLERGY CORNER: Freedom

Posted on 07 January 2016 by LeslieM

The Biblical account of the Jewish Exodus from Egypt has been one of the most inspiring stories for the oppressed, enslaved and downtrodden throughout history. From the American Revolution to the slaves of the American South, to Martin Luther King’s Let Freedom Ring, the narrative of the Exodus provided countless peoples with the courage to hope for a better future, and to act on the dream.

Moses’ first visit to Pharaoh demanding liberty for his people only brought more misery to the Hebrew slaves; the Egyptian monarch increased their torture. The Hebrews now would not listen any longer to the promise of redemption. Now let us pay heed to this strange verse in Exodus:

So G-d spoke to Moses and to Aaron, and He gave them a command (charge) for the children of Israel, and a command to Pharaoh the king of Egypt, to let the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt.

G-d is charging Moses with two directives: Command the people of Israel and then command Pharaoh the king. However, the verse is ambiguous: What did G-d command Moses to instruct the people? The message for Pharaoh is clear: Let the children of Israel out of Egypt. But what is it that Moses is supposed to command the people themselves?

The Jerusalem Talmud says something profoundly enigmatic: G-d instructed Moses to command to the Jewish people the laws of freeing slaves.

The Talmud is referring to a law recorded later in Exodus: If a Jew sells himself as a slave, the owner must let him go after six years. He is forbidden to hold on to the slave for longer. This was the law Moses was to share with the Israelites while they were in Egyptian bondage.

Yet, this seems like a cruel joke. The Children of Israel at this point were crushed and tormented slaves themselves, subjugated by a genocidal despot and a tyrannical regime, enduring horrific torture. Yet,at this point in time, G-d wants Moses to command them about the laws relevant to the aristocrat, the feudal lord, the slave-owner?

The answer to this question is profoundly simple and moving, and is vital to the understanding of liberty in the Biblical imagination.

Before Pharaoh can liberate the Jewish slaves, they must be ready to become free. You can take a man out of slavery, but it may prove more challenging to take slavery out of a man. Externally, you may be free; internally, you may still be enslaved.

What is the first and foremost symptom of being free? That you learn to confer freedom on others.

The dictator, the control freak, or the abusive spouse or parent, does not know how give others freedom. He (or she) feels compelled to force others into the mold that he has created for them. Uncomfortable in his own skin, he is afraid that someone will overshadow him, expose his weaknesses, usurp his position or make him feel extra in this world. Outwardly he attempts to appear powerful, but, inwardly, his power is a symptom of inner misery and confinement.

Only when one learns to embrace others, not for whom he would like them to be, but for whom they are, then can he begin to embrace himself, not for whom he wishes he was, but for whom he is. When we free those around us, we are freeing ourselves. By accepting them, we learn to accept ourselves.

Who is powerful? He who empowers. Who is free? He who can free others. Who is a leader? He who creates other leaders.

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power,” President Abraham Lincoln said. Ask yourself, do you know how to celebrate the soaring success of your loved ones and constituents? Do you encourage them to spread their wings and maximize their potentials? Can you allow others to shine?

Pharaoh may set you free physically. But former slaves can become present tyrants. People who were abused often become abusers themselves. It is what they know about life; it is the paradigm they were raised with. They grew up in abuse and slavery, so they continue the cycle with others.

The first commandment the Jews had to hear from Moses, before even he could go the Pharaoh to demand he let them go free, was, “One day you will be free. Remember that freedom is a gift; use it to free others.”

Rabbi Tzvi Dechter is the Director of Chabad of North Broward Beaches located at 4081 N. Federal Hwy., #100A, Pompano Beach, FL 33064. For all upcoming events please visit www.JewishLHP.com.

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Local dancer’s journey to Alvin Ailey

Posted on 04 January 2016 by JLusk

PaigeWerman photobyNir Arieli

Ever since she was 2 years old, Paige Werman has been a dancer. Little did she know as a child that dance would set her on a career track that would include a coveted spot at The Ailey School in New York City.

Her early journey into the dance world included dancing at several studios and eventually ending up at Performance Edge 2 Dance Studio in Parkland (They also have a studio in Boca).

When asked if anyone in her family is in the creative arts, she said, “My dad is a shoe designer. I guess that is where I get my creative genes from. My brother plays an instrument and my grandma writes poetry and draws.”

“At age 8, I started completing regionally, eventually nationally. My passion for dance was growing,” said Werman, who said she likes all dance styles but feels most comfortable with Contemporary and Hip-Hop.

“When I was looking into college, I knew I wanted to be a dancer as a career,” said the 21-year-old who grew up in Lighthouse Point.

After attending school at North Broward Preparatory, she ended up going to Pine Crest in High School and taking classes through their ballet program. It wasn’t until her Freshman year that her dance technique really took on a new level as she started attending Performance Edge 2 Dance Studio.

“Being there, I was able to perform almost three times per month because there was so much competition. It offered me the chance to be in so many numbers. I don’t think a lot of people who go to these classical training programs have an opportunity to do so much,” she said.

In addition, she had the opportunity to go to New York in 2011 with her mother and do a summer intensive in Contemporary Ballet.

“I fell in love with the lifestyle and decided I wanted to be in New York. I applied to Rutgers, New York University, Alvin Ailey and the University of Florida. I got into them all. But Ailey was the best,” she said.

Werman ended up doing a special Bachelor’s of Fine Arts joint program at Alvin Ailey and also Fordham University that allowed her to do a double degree in dance and environmental policy.

PaigeWerman

Photo by Kyle Froman

“The dancers are accommodated to because there are so many students who dance,” she explained, adding that dancers take different classes depending on their level. While Freshmen take specialty classes like Improv and West African dance, Sophomores take Jazz and start with Composition, which continues into their Junior year. Seniors work on Limón technique, a modern technique created by José Limón, and also have the opportunity to do choreography and cast for their performance. In addition to doing specialized classes and her standard technique classes, she also has classes on working with a partner in several styles. Overall, dance really takes over her life and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

She aspires to be a part of the main professional company, which performs at Lincoln Center. So far, she has been asked to audition twice for the second company, Ailey II. While she would love a career at Alvin Ailey, she also would love to work abroad in Israel at the Batsheva Dance Company, something she heard about through a friend who attended a program called Dance Journey through the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company.

About Alvin Ailey

The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater began originally in 1958 in New York City and has been an instrumental step in the lives of many dancers, including Madonna Louise Ciccone (who would later become a singer named Madonna). The Alvin Ailey company has captivated audiences in more than 70 countries around the world. In fact, they will be in Miami Feb. 18-21 at the Adrienne Arsht Center. For more information, visit www.alvinailey.org.

 

 

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Winter Wonderland

Posted on 03 January 2016 by JLusk

1) Olivia, 4, sliding down snow hill!DSC08254

Olivia, 4, sliding down snow hill.

By Diane Emeott

Erica Rubin brought her 3-month-old daughter, Violet, to see snow for the first time at the annual Winter Wonderland event at the Villages of Hillsboro Park on Thursday afternoon, Dec. 17. (Rubin was also handing out flyers for Brandon’s Run for Autism, a 5Kcharity walk/run coming up on Saturday, Jan. 9 at Quiet Waters Park).

Meanwhile, another snow enthusiast, Olivia, 4, was busy sliding down one of the two huge snow hills – one for ages 5 and under, and one for 6 and up.

2) Standing in line for Snow Hill.DSC08263

Standing in line for snow hill.

“She’s a snow girl,” said her mom Aimee. “We come here every year and to Colorado!”

Twenty-five tons of “snow” was delivered by Florida Ice Manufacturing Corp., at a cost of $4,875 out of the Parks & Recreation Dept. budget for the event.

Eric Williams brought kids from the new Highlands Community Center and Oveta McKeithen Park (Westside Park) to play in the snow. (Highlands Community Center just had its ribbon cutting in March and has been open to the public since June, he added).

3) Sleigh ride.DSC08301

Sleigh ride.

Families at Winter Wonderland could also participate in real horse-drawn sleigh rides, cookie decorating, games and photos with Santa.

 

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Rosemurgy Properties completes the 23Hundred

Posted on 03 January 2016 by JLusk

TOP-Alex Rosemurgy proudly stands near the completed 23 Hundred building, the latest Rosemurgy Properties project.

CEO Alex Rosemurgy II stands proudly near the completed 23 Hundred building, the latest Rosemurgy property.

Alex Rosemurgy talks about building the business

By Rachel Galvin

With the finishing touches placed on the final unit of 23Hundred, future home of Kay Jewelers, the latest Rosemurgy Property is complete. Located at 2350 and 2390 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, the unique shopping centers holds seven tenants. The other six are Jersey Mike’s Subs, Smoothie King, T-Mobile, Chipotle, Pei Wei and Supercuts. They held a ribbon cutting for the complex on Dec. 9 and many of those involved with the project were in attendance, as well as County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Mayor Lamar Fisher, along with other commissioners and dignitaries.

Rosemurgy Properties was opened in 1977 by Jim Rosemurgy. He began with Apartments at Crystal Lake in Deerfield and built from there as he acquired more and more properties in Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach and Boca Raton. He got into development as a byproduct of working with his other company, Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate, said his son, Alex. Their portfolio grew to include “multi-family, retail, self storage, and office and land properties, with the focus of a long term diversified investment strategy.” What really put the company on the map, said, Alex, was the creation of FAU Research Park. In addition to their diverse portfolio built through the company, he also credits great partnerships with others as a source for continued success.

“We did not have a lot of problems during the downturn [the last recession] because we had a good financial base,” said Alex.

When Jim retired in 2011, Alex took over running Rosemurgy Properties. Since then, he has continued to focus on expanding their portfolio, going more into retail and self storage. Among his projects they worked on this past year is a multi-family, student housing unit called University Park off-campus for FAU students.

“We are looking at entering other South Florida markets. If we want to grow, we have to expand our footprint,” said Alex, who said he spends long hours working to build a great platform, but credits also his staff for their achievements. “We truly are a family company. I believe in making sure we have a happy workplace. We have a great team of consultants and creative people.”

Asked his advice for those looking to build their business, he commented, “You have to be disciplined. You have got to execute to performance and stay in your lane [do what you are good at doing]. Do things that work. You have to have a great staff. You are only as good as the people you work with.”

Regarding the 23Hundred building, he is pleased with the outcome and feels it provides a comfortable atmosphere for business owners and those who visit the complex.

Architect Juan Caycedo, AIA, of RLC Architects, who also worked on University Park, said of the project, “We wanted a building that would stand out, that becomes more an urban village than a center you drive by and miss altogether. The architecture is pretty simple … [made with] exposed concrete. At the end of the day, it is a timeless building.”

Alex agreed, saying, the building is sustainable and even years to come it will look “like the wrapping just came off.” He added that the signage, which is also unique, was equally important.

“RLC is visionary,” he added, saying they originally met Juan when working with him on a Boca Raton Bank United. The contemporary feel of that building with its exposed concrete was emulated on The 23 Hundred. RLC has worked on projects like Fifth Avenue Shops and Royal Palm Plaza in Boca Raton as well.

“The lessons we learned [on Bank United] allowed us to build even better,” said Alex.

4-CROP waste up-Father and son, Jim and Alex Rosemurgy.

Father and son — Jim and Alex Rosemurgy.

His father Jim also attended the ribbon cutting and said, “Alex works on [each project] from the lease to the [completion]. We take great pride in what we do. To have the mayor stand up and say ‘this is great’ makes you want to do more. I am a proud father.”

Where The 23Hundred is situated was originally an overflow parking lot. The unique architecture here could prove a foreshadowing of things to come.
“The design is different in a good way,” said Land-Use Attorney Scott Backman, of Dunay, Miskel and Backman, LLP, mentioning that newer anchor stores like Sports Authority and Whole Foods across the street call for updated architecture, rather than a more cookie cutter style. The idea, he said, is to “design something in a more user-friendly way. People can come to the jewelry store and stop and walk around.”

For more information on Rosemurgy Properties, visit www.rosemurgyproperties.com.

2-The 23Hundred has seven tenants.

The 23Hundred has seven tenants. Sherry Ferrante Photography.

 

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Rosemurgy Properties completes The 23Hundred

Posted on 03 January 2016 by LeslieM

Alex Rosemurgy talks about building the business

rose122415By Rachel Galvin

With the finishing touches placed on the final unit of The 23Hundred, future home of Kay Jewelers, the latest Rosemurgy Property is complete. Located at 2350 and 2390 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, the unique shopping center holds seven tenants. The other six are Jersey Mike’s Subs, Smoothie King, T-Mobile, Chipotle, Pei Wei and Supercuts. They held a ribbon cutting for the complex on Dec. 9 and many of those involved with the project were in attendance, as well as County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Mayor Lamar Fisher, Chamber President Ric Green, along with other commissioners and dignitaries.

Rosemurgy Properties was opened in 1977 by Jim Rosemurgy. He began with Apartments at Crystal Lake in Deerfield and built from there as he acquired more and more properties in Pompano Beach, Deerfield Beach and Boca Raton. He got into development as a byproduct of working with his other company (which he co-owns), Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate, said his son, Alex.

Their portfolio grew to include “multi-family, retail, self storage, and office and land properties, with the focus of a long term diversified investment strategy.” What really put the company on the map, said, Alex, was the creation of FAU Research Park. In addition to their diverse portfolio built through the company, he also credits great partnerships with others as a source for continued success.

We did not have a lot of problems during the downturn [the last recession] because we had a good financial base,” said Alex.

When Jim retired in 2011, Alex took over running Rosemurgy Properties. Since then, he has continued to focus on expanding their portfolio, going more into retail and self storage. Among his projects they worked on this past year is a multi-family, student housing unit called University Park off-campus for FAU students.

We are looking at entering other South Florida markets. If we want to grow, we have to expand our footprint,” said Alex, who said he spends long hours working to build a great platform, but credits also his staff for their achievements. “We truly are a family company. I believe in making sure we have a happy workplace. We have a great team of consultants and creative people.”

Asked his advice for those looking to build their business, he commented, “You have to be disciplined.

You have got to execute to performance and stay in your lane [do what you are good at doing]. Do things that work. You have to have a great staff. You are only as good as the people you work with.”

Regarding The 23Hundred building, he said he is pleased with the outcome and feels it provides a comfortable atmosphere for business owners and those who visit the complex.

Architect Juan Caycedo, AIA, of RLC Architects, who also worked on University Park, said of the project, “We wanted a building that would stand out, that becomes more an urban village than a center you drive by and miss altogether. The architecture is pretty simple … [made with] exposed concrete. At the end of the day, it is a timeless building.”

Alex agreed, saying, the building is sustainable and even years to come it will look “like the wrapping just came off.” He added that the signage, which is also unique, was equally important.

RLC is visionary,” he added, saying they originally met Juan when working with him on a Boca Raton Bank United. The contemporary feel of that building with its exposed concrete was emulated on The 23 Hundred. RLC has worked on projects like Fifth Avenue Shops and Royal Palm Plaza in Boca Raton as well.

The lessons we learned [on Bank United] allowed us to build even better,” said Alex.

His father Jim also attended the ribbon cutting and said, “Alex works on [each project] from the lease to the [completion]. We take great pride in what we do. To have the mayor stand up and say ‘this is great’ makes you want to do more. I am a proud father.”

Where The 23Hundred is situated was originally an overflow parking lot. The unique architecture here could prove a foreshadowing of things to come.

The design is different in a good way,” said Land-Use Attorney Scott Backman, of Dunay, Miskel and Backman, LLP, mentioning that newer anchor stores like Sports Authority and Whole Foods across the street call for updated architecture, rather than a more cookie cutter style. The idea, he said, is to “design something in a more user-friendly way. People can come to the jewelry store and stop and walk around.”

For more information on Rosemurgy Properties, visit www.rosemurgyproperties.com.

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