CLERGY CORNER: A new day, a new thing!

Posted on 25 May 2017 by LeslieM

Our modern world has grown accustomed to newness, originality, innovation and fresh ideas. Consider that the 20th century was the apex of the Industrial Revolution, which dramatically transformed the way in which we live. The television, air conditioning, antibiotics, lasers, aircraft, computers and the Internet — things we cannot imagine living without today — were the products of the previous century. The 21st century advances have given rise to 3D printing, nanotechnology, the bitcoin, tablets, stem-cell treatments, Smartphones and social media.

The speed with which today’s generation adapts to new things has caused some to hail this as the century of advancement. No longer do people spend their entire lives trying to figure out formulas and strategies for improvement. The ink is scarcely dry on the latest press announcement when another more impressive achievement occurs. In the past, individuals would invest huge amounts of time to create. Their whole lives were spent working on inventions. [Some say] Thomas Edison tried 10,000 times before creating the light bulb; Henry Ford spent years before he created the affordable car and Ford Motor company.

Today’s pace is much quicker. Someone remarked that today “we want everything yesterday and technology makes it happen.” In an article in Virgin’s online magazine Disruptors, Alison Coleman wrote, “Unlike the great inventions of the Industrial Revolution that have stayed the course, today’s next big thing is superseded at an alarming speed by the next, next big thing.”

If the 20th century was the century of big innovation, this century is about innovation improvement. Every day brings the possibility that some ‘better thing or process’ is being introduced to society. And more people are moving away from the old toward what is new.

In Isaiah 43:18-19, the prophet declared hope to a people distressed by their captivity. It included an admonition against lingering on memories of the past — “Do not remember the former things, nor consider the things of old. Behold, I will do a new thing, now it shall spring forth; shall you not know it? I will even make a road in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.” A generation had come and gone, and they saw no sign of change on the horizon. They longed for release and a return to the life of the past. But he stirred their expectation by proclaiming that God was preparing to do something different, remarkable, unconventional and new!

Change, progress and advancement are part of the human experience. Some changes we embrace and others we lament, while longing for ‘better,’ simpler times. As believers, we ought to welcome newness and freshness. If improvement and convenience are the result of change, then we benefit. Even setback and loss can teach invaluable lessons. God’s word gives ample indication that our lives and experiences with Him are to lead us to progress, growth and spiritual maturity. Life does not have to be monotonous, stagnant and dull. Change that is promised and initiated by Him is always good. And every day brings the experience of new mercies. In this season of commencement, summer travels and family reunions, let’s be determined to expect and embrace something new!

Bishop Patrick L. Kelly is the pastor of Cathedral Church of God, 365 S. Dixie Hwy., Deerfield Beach, FL 33441. 954-427-0302

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