Somerset Key wins first game on the diamond

Posted on 18 April 2019 by LeslieM

By Gary Curreri

Somerset Key Academy [which is where Zion Lutheran used to be in Deerfield] recently won its first baseball game in school history.

Somerset Key picked up an 18-4 win over Donna Klein for the first victory in school history. Shaq Rolle clubbed a home run, while Paul Rolle had an inside-the-park home run for the Lions. The winning pitcher was Paul Rolle.

“It was very cool to pick up that win against Donna Klein,” said Silvia, a fixture with the Deerfield Beach Little League program, who has also coached high school baseball throughout the county. He has coached high school and travel baseball for 31 years.

“We put the schedule together late and had like three weeks to practice before our first game. It was a really big deal. It was a huge win. You can only practice so much,” Silvia added. “It is a different experience when the umpires say, ‘play ball.’ As a coach, practice is my time and when the umpires are there, it is the players’ time. They show us what they learned. It was a lot of fun.”

The Lions are currently 2-2 this season with a game scheduled for Thursday against Atlantic Christian at 4 p.m. They also beat Somerset Miramar and lost to Highlands Christian, and dropped a 5-4 decision against Sheridan Hills.

“We were leading in the last inning and gave it away,” Silvia said. “My closer couldn’t throw strikes and we lost it. We could easily be 3-1 right now. It’s okay because we are learning.”

Silvia had to be prodded to take over the program. He was an assistant coach at Northeast High School last season and was planning on taking the year off — until six members of Somerset Keys came to his house and sat in his living room and convinced him to coach because they didn’t have a coach.

“After the AD and a couple of dads called, they asked me to help out,” Silvia said. “I couldn’t say no. The kids said they would do all of the work. I just wanted them to learn the game of baseball, have fun and grow the program. They are having fun and have won games. With our loss to Highlands Christian, I told the boys that was a good, established program and we hope to be there in a few years.”

Silvia hoped to have a middle school team too, but there weren’t enough players to form a middle school team, so several of those players are on the varsity. They have just three seniors on the team and the rest are underclassmen and middle schoolers.

“I didn’t really know what to expect because I am used to coaching the bigger schools and the travel teams,” he said. “We had tryouts and I had kids coming out in shorts and sneakers and didn’t know what to expect.

We had kids falling off at the beginning of the year because they couldn’t handle the conditioning. These kids are ball players. We have 10 games left and I am hoping to win out.”

Because they are a first-year, independent team, they will not compete in the playoffs this year.

“We have some really good younger players, so I am really encouraged,” Silvia said. “Since they never had a program there before, they would lose players to the neighboring schools and we wanted to keep them there. We want to put the baseball program on the map.”

The team is composed of Shaq Rolle, Zack Johnson, Paul Rolle, Kobe Rolle, Rogelio Vargas, Janelle Calvet, Sergio De Armas, Armari Santana, Marcus Febuzzi, Seidel De Armas, Jeb Yanto, Matt DeOlivera, Jesus Garcia, David Davila, Trent Hussy and Nate Reid.

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FLICKS: See Great Bear Rainforest 3D on Eddie Albert Day

Posted on 18 April 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

This Monday, April 22 marks the 113th birthday of actor Eddie Albert. Albert’s career spanned six decades as a leading man and as a character actor. He was Oscar nominated for Roman Holiday in 1954 and for The Heartbreak Kid 19 years later.  While a costar to actors like John Wayne, Ronald Reagan and Burt Reynolds, Albert is best remembered for his television show Green Acres, in which he, Eva Gabor and Arnold Ziffel starred in 170 episodes.

During the final season of Green Acres, he became politically active with environmental issues for the remainder of his life. TV Guide called him “an ecological Paul Revere” for his work with the Boy Scouts of America, serving on the Department of Energy’s Advisory Board, growing an organic garden in his backyard and founding the City Children’s Farms for inner city children. He also participated in the creation of “Earth Day,” in which organizers honor him by holding this event on the actor’s birthday.

The preservation of the environment is the responsibility of the current generation, who are merely stewards of the land for future generations. Forty years ago, broadcast television did a better job presenting environmental science to the public, minus the politicization. Fortunately, a documentary like Great Bear Rainforest 3D is still being produced and can be seen on a very big screen.

Set in British Columbia near the Alaska Peninsular, Great Bear Rainforest 3D is currently on rotation at the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Discovery and Science on the 6-story IMAX screen. Narrated by Ryan Reynolds, this film features overwhelming visuals of a land with very little human contact.

The only human contact is the indigenous people who live off the land with a symbiotic relationship with the bears and the land. Both creature’s diets thrive on the salmon swimming upstream.  With technical precision, this 10 minute sequence covers much drama. One key sequence features a Mama Grizzly Bear attempting to feed herself and her cubs while fending off a greedy male bear. Upon catching a fish, there is a pretty grisly sequence in which a bear skins and devours a salmon that is still half alive.

The star of this filmis Mox, a white bear. To the Native Americans, Mox is the spirit bear of the land. While the science is real and the cinematography is remarkable, this film presented an understated reason why religion is variably part of science.

As we have tragically learned from Notre Dame Cathedral this week, it was the science of neglect that caused the fire, a chemistry of elements that ignited the blaze [lack of fire prevention safeguards]. Yet, when the inferno was doused, the image of a cross illuminated through the darkness and smoke.

Have a happy and thoughtful Passover, Earth Day, Eddie Albert Day and Happy Easter.

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CLERGY CORNER: Until we meet again

Posted on 18 April 2019 by LeslieM

It seems strange to begin an article about Easter talking about Christmas. However, I do begin most of my Christmas sermons talking about Easter. Usually, I start my Christmas sermon by saying something like “Today, we celebrate the second most important Christian holiday.” You should see the looks of confusion I get. Then, I say “Without Easter, today would just be another birthday.”

It is true. Without the Crucifixion and Resurrection; without Good Friday and Easter Sunday, we would be left with words and miracles from the greatest man who ever lived. But because of Easter, we celebrate his words, his miracles, his death and resurrection, and the promise that awaits us in God’s glorious kingdom.

In our culture, my statement is still quite jarring. We like Christmas, regardless of who we are, believer and non-believer alike loves presents, Santa, Christmas trees, cookies. Christmas has become so secularized that you can listen to hours of Christmas music and never hear of the birth of Jesus. Some people even avoid the word “Christmas” altogether.

You really can’t do that with Easter. Sure, there is a bunny and chocolate eggs and a couple of Peter Cottontail songs. But Easter doesn’t get the same attention as Christmas. I think this is good. Without the Resurrection, Easter would be all chocolate and jelly beans. Easter gives meaning to Easter.

I think about the years that I have served as a pastor, 25 years this coming September. I think about the privilege and joy that I have had meeting wonderful, wise, generous, lively and loving people. I think about how much better my life is because of the people I served, knew and loved. Many have died and their legacy lives in my heart.

Easter is the promise that I will see them again. Easter is the joyful reminder that they are with the Lord. This blessed assurance gives me the consolation that helps me go from day to day. Easter reminds me that the friends who I know and love now will be my friends forever.

Dear people of Deerfield Beach (and beyond), this will be my last Easter at Zion Lutheran Church. I am returning to my home with my family. Zion has been a wonderful congregation to serve and I have made lifelong friends not only at Zion, but in this community that I love so dearly. It is going to be an emotional Easter for me, but, because of Easter, I know that I never really have to say goodbye. Because of Easter, I can simply say “Until we meet again.”

So, Deerfield Beach and surrounding communities, I say on behalf of Zion and myself “Blessed Easter.” And, Because of Easter, I can say “Until we meet again.”

Pastor Gross is a pastor of Zion Lutheran Church, located at 959 SE 6 Ave., Deerfield Beach, FL 33441. For more information, call 954-421-3146 or visit www.zion-lutheran.org.

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Knights help with Miracle League

Posted on 11 April 2019 by LeslieM

By Gary Curreri

Highlands Christian Academy’s baseball team loaded up in their bus and made the 35-minute drive up to the Miracle League of Palm Beach County’s “field of dreams.”

Along the way, they played games, built on some team bonding, but when they arrived at Miller Park in Delray Beach, they were consumed with helping others.

The Miracle League, a baseball league for special needs athletes, gives its participants an opportunity to play the sport with others. Its players hail from Wellington, Jupiter, Port St. Lucie, Delray Beach, Boynton Beach, Coral Springs, Ft. Lauderdale, Parkland, and Boca Raton.

Julia and her husband Jeff incorporated the league in 2005 and used the Bucky Dent Baseball School infield from 2007 to 2010 until they started to play their games on their own field.

The Kadels, through grassroots efforts and public and private donations and monies, raised $550,000 to build a handicapped-accessible field complete with recycled rubber and ramps for wheelchairs. They opened a handicapped-accessible playground and recently raised nearly $100,000 to resurface the field this summer as 250 people turned out for the Dinner on the Diamond event.

There are six teams in the league this year with about 16 players on each and a cheerleading squad with seven members. There are also about 160 buddies. Garrich Phelipa, a senior pitcher/1st baseman for the Knights, enjoyed his time.

“This is fun,” said Phelipa, 17, of Pompano Beach. “It’s great. The children like it. This is my first time doing anything like this. It makes it fun for the team because we get to be together and do a good thing.”

Teammate Isaac Dominguez, 17, a sophomore catcher/infielder, of Pompano Beach agreed: “This is awesome. It gets you thinking as to how privileged you really are and being able to do things by yourself.

Anytime you get a chance to help the kids that are in need, it is an awesome time. It just gives a good feeling to your heart just to help people that need it.”

“The team had a fun time coming over here on the bus,” Dominguez added. “We played a game on the bus where we named MLB players and now that we are at the field, we are just having fun with the kids and enjoying our time together.”

Knights head coach Bruce Charlebois said it was an eye-opener for his players.

“We sometimes think that we are coming to these things to bless others and serve the Lord and we are the ones that continuously get blessed,” Charlebois said. “We have a heart for special needs. My mother was very involved in the Special Olympics. I have had a couple of special needs clinics at my field and I just feel it does a world of good for the world.

“Nowadays these kids are kind of stuck in their technology and a lot of them are really in their own world,” Charlebois continued. “They struggle with communication skills and the things that happen when we come out here change their life. We would like to think permanently, not short term, and they start to appreciate life and what they have. I think it is a great thing for everybody involved.”

This is the first time that Highlands Christian helped the Miracle League as a team and Charlebois said they were excited about the opportunity.

José Dennis Martínez Ortiz, nicknamed “El Presidente” a four-time major league all-star was on hand to pitch at the opener.

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FLICKS: The Chaperone opens, Game of Thrones party, Plan for Avengers: Endgame now!

Posted on 11 April 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

After decades of watching The Three Stooges on television, one of the Farrelly Brothers admitted that while Curly and Moe were usually the center of attention, they found that Larry may have been the most important Stooge. The Farrelly Brothers credit him as the best actor who supported every scene that he was in. It was Larry’s job to keep the focus on Moe poking Curly in the eyes for comedic effect.

Opening this weekend, The Chaperone is the story about somebody who is not the center of attention, yet is an individual who keeps many disparate people together. Norma (Elizabeth McGovern) is a reliable individual. She is married to Alan Carlisle (Campbell Scott) who is a public figure in Kansas and they are patrons of the arts. While catching a dance recital featuring Young Louise Brooks (Haley Lu Richardson), Backstage, Mother Brooks asks Norma to chaperone Young Louise to New York City to take dance classes with the Denishawn Academy.

While The Chaperone could divert attention to the legendary silent screen star Louise Brooks, director Michael Engler keeps the focus on the title character. We learn that Norma was an orphan from the big city raised by nuns and relocated to Kansas. Married young, Norma confronts secrets from her past and current domestic woes. For Norma, chaperoning Louise Brooks is the least of her problems.

Given her Oscar-nominated role as the wild Evelyn Nesbit from Ragtime, released 38 years ago, Elizabeth McGovern shines as straitlaced Norma. She is the eye of the hurricane and the two performances, nearly four decades apart, bookend McGovern’s underrated talent as an actress. The Chaperone is good drama that celebrates good deeds under pressure.

On a more expansive note, Game of Thrones opens its final season this Sunday evening. While people are binge watching the previous seven seasons, Savor Cinema (503 SE 6 St., in Ft. Lauderdale) plans a season premier party starting at 7:30 p.m. Perhaps an evening of debauchery would be a more accurate description since flagons of ale, barrels of wine, Wildfire shots and Lannister turkey legs, and other dragon dishes, will be consumed within the John Mager Courtyard. Dress Gothic chic. Free parking at the courthouse garage. Sundays meters are free too. Party tickets: $20 FLIFF Members/$25 non-members, includes complimentary drinks and food!

Watching television shows in movie theaters is nothing new. When M*A*S*H ended its 11 year broadcast run on the CBS Network in February 1983, parties were held and people went to civic centers to watch the final episode.

Yet, it is fascinating how small-screened television is driving the markets for big screened entertainment.

Speaking of big screen, the biggest screen in the land, Museum of Discovery and Science – IMAX’s 6-story-high screen has already sold-out screenings of Avengers: Endgame, which opens in two weeks. However, there are some great documentaries that will be playing on the big screen, most notably Great Bear Rainforest and Great Barrier Reef. For those in search of more quieter dramas, check out The Chaperone this weekend.

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CLERGY CORNER: Over entertained and under challenged!

Posted on 11 April 2019 by LeslieM

It’s been many years since I first heard Andy Stanley make the statement, “Today’s teenagers are over entertained and under challenged.” His sermon, preached at First Baptist Church of Atlanta, was addressing the way so many churches were approaching student ministry and measuring success by the numbers. His observation was correct back then, and it is still correct today.

In a church culture that measures success almost solely by numbers, it only makes sense that youth pastors are prone to entertaining students and striving to gather the masses in order to be viewed as successful. Sadly, the same entertainment mentality is true with adults. Too many adults choose a church based on the length of the services, whether the church has a softball team, how humorous the pastor is, and whether or not they like the music. These superficial factors show the shallowness plaguing the Christian church today.

The long-term effects of the entertainment focus in ministry can be seen in the spiritual adolescence prevalent among today’s believers. We are in dire need of discipleship. The effectiveness of discipleship can be measured by whether or not those who call themselves disciples begin to disciple others. In essence, the student should eventually become the teacher. But, how is someone who has been over entertained and under challenged supposed to gain the knowledge necessary to teach? The Apostle Paul describes this dilemma in Hebrews 5:12-14 NIV“ In fact, though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you the elementary truths of God’s word all over again. You need milk, not solid food! 13 Anyone who lives on milk, being still an infant, is not acquainted with the teaching about righteousness. 14 But solid food is for the mature, who by constant use have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil.”

Not only has the focus on entertainment in ministry caused a shallowness of knowledge, but it has also resulted in fewer people being exposed to real ministry opportunities. Churches used to “do“ ministry, go on mission trips, serve their communities, and impact their world. That exposure to ministry often resulted in growing churches and people surrendering to become vocational ministers. Today, fewer people are entering vocational ministry, seminary enrollment has declined nationally, as well as church attendance across denominational lines. The common denominator is that too many church-goers have been and continue to be over entertained and under challenged.

So, which word best describes the church you attend – “entertainment” or “discipleship?” It’s never too late to start challenging others to grow spiritually. Jesus challenged 12 men, and in just three years He prepared them to impact eternity! Think how different the world would have been if He only entertained them. Think how different our world could be, if today’s churches will rise up and challenge those who God has entrusted to us!

Dr. Gary A. Colboch is Lead Pastor at Grace Church (501 NE 48 St. in Pompano Beach). Contact info: 954-421-0190 or
pastor@gbcfl.org.

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Women in Distress tourney nets $22K

Posted on 04 April 2019 by LeslieM

 

By Gary Curreri

The 7th Annual Women’s Invitational Golf Tournament benefiting Women in Distress was a great success as more than $22,000 was raised for the local organization. A total of 32 teams with 128 players took part in the tournament at the Pompano Beach Golf Club’s Palms Course. This year’s charity tournament, produced by the Colony West Women’s Golf Group, was moved from the Colony West course because their clubhouse with a restaurant is under construction.

“The money raised for Women in Distress by the tournament was $22,315.01,” said Tournament Chair Jan Parke. “It is the most amount that our tournament has every raised.”

Parke said the overall amount raised for Women in Distress is $87,813.22. The Tournament Naming Sponsor –  Norman & Bettina Roberts Foundation, Inc. – donated a $10,000 check for Women in Distress and that was arranged by Tournament Assistant Chair Alberta Bove.

The winners of the Low Gross competition with a 66 were the Damn Damsels composed of Taffy Brower, Nancy Hersey, Elise Gordon and Mechelle Brown. Four shots back in second place was the Carolina Babes, made up of Kris Boogren, Molly O’Neill, JoAnn Feindt and Suzanne Rho.

The Birdies and Blossoms were the winners of the Low Net competition after they carded a 50.4 score. That team was Pam Cromwell, Joyce Gelli, Nancy Bigwood and Nancy Rose Peduzzi.

Other Low Net winners were: 2. Wicked Stix, who was composed of Janet Anderson, Penny Eppy, Marilyn Hughes, Renate Hood, who shot 50.6; 3. The Swinging Springers, which was made up of Wendy Furth, Pam Schiff, Sue Ann Burns and Nancy Burns, who shot 51 (won tiebreaker); 4. DJCM’S, composed of Donna Casey, Mary Mahan, Connie Cluen and Janet Burt, who carded a 51; 5. (The team of) Par-Fectionists, composed of Jean Cerra, Dale Stallings, Donna Henderson and Gail McLellan, who shot 51.6.

The Closest to the Pin winner was Debbie Davis, while the Closest to the Wiggly Line winner was Barbara Brody.

Mary Riedel, the president and CEO of Women in Distress Broward County, Inc. also spoke at the luncheon and described the organization.

Other committee members included Geri Thomas (registration), Natalee Jones (prizes), Mary Bock (goodie bags), Jackie Rogazione (hole signs) and Penny Eppy (miscellanies).

“We had a lot of the players who talked to me and our committee saying they enjoyed the tournament and it was very organized and asked if they could sign up that day for the 2020 tournament,” Parke added. “Many liked the drawing prizes, including 25 foursomes from golf courses and the special prize of seven days at the Pokolodi Lodge in Colorado — they bought more for tickets. I was pleased that we had so many teams that played in previous years,” she continued. “We always let them register before we put the opportunity to the public. This year, 28 teams out of the 32 were previous teams with most of the same players.”

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Storm Boy opens this weekend, Dumbo deserved more love

Posted on 04 April 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Despite being No. 1 in the box office last weekend, Dumbo disappointed in the box office numbers. Earning only 25 percent of its production costs, Dumbo faces much competition this spring break season with Shazam!, Pet Sematary and Storm Boy opening this weekend. The sad thing is that Dumbo is fine family entertainment directed by Tim Burton. While a darker version of the popular animated motion picture from 1941, this modern version of Dumbo eschews talking and singing animals. The new film focuses on a family and a small business facing a financial crisis.

Set in Sarasota, circa 1919, the film opens with the Medici Brothers Circus launching their annual barnstorming tour through the American Heartland. While in Joplin, Missouri (Walt Disney’s hometown), Ringmaster Medici (Danny Devito) welcomes the return of his ace trick rider (Colin Farrell) to his family and the birth of a baby elephant with big ears.

The story is simple and conflict will ensue. However, it is the attention to detail that makes Dumbo so special. Music that animals sang to in the first movie is used as heartfelt musical cues. “Baby Mine” is rendered with sideshow performers (bearded lady, strong man) playing a flute and ukulele, while resting between shows. Despite some mean behavior and a jump scare, Dumbo is a sweet movie to take children to if only to see how a family sticks together to solve problems.

Storm Boy opens this weekend and contains many of the same themes as Dumbo with far less special effects. Based on the novella by Colin Thiele, Storm Boy is a rite of passage story that is set on the Australian coast. Geoffrey Rush (who also produced) portrays Mike Kingley, a retiring business man who is concerned that his son wants to pave paradise and put up a parking lot, upsetting the economical balance of the beach front.

When reuniting with his granddaughter, Kingley reflects upon his youth with three pelicans, in particular Mr. Percival, an orphan pelican.  Mr. Percival and Kingley have a series of encounters on the island and become local celebrities.

“A good story has to go wrong before it gets better,” Kingley tells his granddaughter late in the film. It is sad, but Storm Boy concludes on a life affirming note. In fact, it will inspire you to go for an early morning walk on Deerfield Beach to watch and observe the birds on our beach.

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CLERGY CORNER: Three necessary items for internal liberation: Wine, Maror, Matzah

Posted on 04 April 2019 by LeslieM

The three most important ingredients at the seder table [for Passover] are the wine, matzah and maror (bitter herbs) for these three items capture the three foundational ideas that can allow us to set ourselves free.

A) The first step is wine. Wine possesses deep potency.

“When wine enters, secrets come out,” says the Talmud. 

Wine represents the “secrets” in us — for wine itself is a “secret:” It is initially hidden and concealed within the grape, and it takes much labor to extract it from the source; the grapes have to be crushed and the wine to ferment. Wine, an intoxicating beverage, represents the deeply concealed powerful forces lingering within the human psyche.

The first step in setting yourself free is realizing how much more there is to you than what meets the eye. You must recognize your potential — what you were really meant to be, what you are capable of becoming — for you to break out of the chains.

B) This comes together with step two — maror, which represents the bitterness caused by slavery. In order to set yourself free, you have to be able to stare the pain you endured in the face. Repressing pain and making believe it does not exist, only buries it deeper into our psyche. On the night of our freedom, we have to return to the “maror.” We must gaze into our pain, feel it, sense it, grieve for our hurt and, then, as we are staring into the pain, we will find the inner, secret spark of hope and light buried within it.

If we avoid the pain, we can’t discover its inner light. Only when we gaze at it, can we extract the ember hidden within the ashes.

C) Then we have the critical step of matzah. We eat the matzah, says the Haggadah, because the Jews did not have time to wait until the dough had risen; they rushed out of Egypt. I want to ask you … They waited for 210 years… They could not wait another few hours? What was the rush? And even if they were in a rush, why is that such a central theme in the narrative that for thousands of years we are eating only matzah and avoiding all leavened bread? What happened to the virtue of patience?

Answer: The greatest enemy to setting yourself free is delaying things: tough decisions and bold moves. The message of matzah is when it comes to setting yourself free, you have no time to wait even an extra 18 minutes. Do it now! Make that call now. Send that e-mail now. Make that move now. Set up that meeting now. Make that decision now. Start the new behavior now. Confront the situation now. Start doing it now. If it is worth doing, then do it now. Because, as my Rebbe would say, “We want Moshiach NOW.” We want redemption now.

Community Passover Seder — R.S.V.P. at www.JewishLHP.com.

Rabbi Tzvi Dechter is the director of Chabad of North Broward Beaches, located in the Venetian Isle Shopping Center at 2025 E. Sample Rd. in Lighthouse Point. For all upcoming events, please visit www.JewishLHP.com.

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Everything’s Coming Up Rosen: What do you do all day?

Posted on 04 April 2019 by LeslieM


By Emily Rosen

ERosen424@aol.com

www.emilyrosen424.com

There are some people I know who unintentionally sound rude in simply expressing their curiosity when they ask, “What do you do all day?” Actually, I interpret that as a coded unstated question which, in reality, goes like this, “So, old lady, what’s it like to live alone?”

My answer: “Oh Baby! For me, it’s the last phase-of-life dream – being responsible to no one, a reward for all those, yes, mostly wonderful years of being what my family needed me to be but, to be frank, was not always the real me. Now, I am able to navigate from day to day, my journey of choice, while wallowing in long delicious silences as well as whatever sounds I consciously seek.

First, as always, I need to acknowledge that I am lucky, lucky, lucky to be in relatively good health — able to drive, walk (not so well), see and hear (could be better, but…), read (with a magnifying glass), think, feel, muse, ponder, explore, converse and use, with some ease, computer and smart phone.

So, “what do I do all day?” I am out of bed any time between 6 and 8 a.m., and then washed, showered, exercised (daily), dressed and en route to the kitchen, during which lightning-quick time, I alight on my choice of breakfast . Not one to fall into habit, my need for variety sometimes causes the (minor) stress of decision making – as in, what to eat for breakfast, despite that my singular most important mantra is “avoid stress.”

If it’s Sunday, I bike and then read the New York Times, which could account for a major part of the day. Other days, I have the following options (some more chosen commitments than options): prepare for or facilitate a Memoir Writing Class (since the year 2000), co-facilitate a therapeutic support group, go to the Boca Downtown library where, after doing my business, I often just sit on the outdoor swing in the community garden and study the variety of growing veggies, putter around in my own teeny tiny garden caring for the “real” growth and admiring the fake ones that make me smile, invite company for a meal (I love to create my own recipes, which I can never duplicate), keep in touch with friends and family by phone, text, e-mail or snail mail or actual eyeball to eyeball and touch depending on their advanced or laggard ability to communicate and their geographical location. I walk for about 20 minutes in my apartment on a straight path while watching TV or outdoors around a local lake, write a poem, or check out a newly discovered website or TED talk, spend time with Google and Amazon, direct “Alexa” to play music of my current mood while I listen quietly and think great thoughts, the latter sometimes even without the music, plus the usual mandated chores which keep my house tidy the way I like it. I love to wander in Publix and Dollar stores, beach and pool, of course. [I watch] very limited TV, even as I am addicted to “news” (whatever that is, these days), but that’s a whole separate column. I take occasional local three to five day runaways with friends, exploring the glorious diversity of our state. And, as self appointed president of the “Nap Society,” I indulge frequently and highly regard it as a life extending activity.

It’s a good life and I love living it.

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