Women’s History Hall of Fame Brunch

Posted on 06 April 2018 by JLusk

Women’s History Hall Of Fame recipients with commissioners (L to R) Marti McGeary, Vice Mayor Gloria Battle, Commissioner Todd Drosky, Bett Willett, Comm. Bernie Parness, Ginger Alvarez, Kelly Hampton.

By Rachel Galvin

Guests filled up the seats at the pink table-clothed tables at Johnny Tigner Center on March 31 for this year’s Women’s History Hall of Fame Brunch honoring four outstanding local women. Jan Muenzenmaier, who herself was honored in 2016, kicked the program off by introducing Vice Mayor Gloria Battle who, in turn, introduced Linda P. Knowles, of Emmanuel Christian Center Ministries, who did the invocation. Everyone enjoyed a wonderful brunch served up by L&B Catering followed by a humorous and powerful speech by keynote speaker Dr. Rosalind Osgood, who has served as a minister, community organizer, educator and author.

When she reflected over women’s history, Dr. Osgood came across some interesting “role models,” including Lucille Ball, who said the way to stay younger was to “live honestly, eat slowly and lie about your age.” Cher, she said, had fabulous clothes, although some church women might think she exposed a bit too much. There was Esther from Sanford & Son who would fuss and fight with Fred Sanford. Then, there was Edith Bunker, from All in the Family, the ultimate submissive, who was called “dingbat” by her hubby Archie. From her example, Dr. Osgood said she knew she never wanted to end up in that situation. She wanted to be Jeanie from I Dream of Jeanie, a woman with power.

Today, women have #MeToo, she said, but it all started with Tina Turner when she left Ike and kept being and looking better and better. She went on listing other examples of influential women, everyone from Mother Theresa, who, instead of using money for “creature comforts, dared to care for people” to modern examples of powerful women like Beyonce Knowles. We have to be all things… lead in the boardroom and at home, she said, adding that our sole purpose should be to make life a better place.

She talked about the meaning behind the “Super” in “Super Women.” The S stands for “Servant,” saying, “As a super woman, you serve [others].” The U is for “Unpredictable.” She told a story of women who united and used their diverse strengths to get what they wanted. P is for “Providential.” She said that woman is part of God’s providential plan. E is for “Elegance,” which she said women bring to everything. R is for “Relentless,” she said, adding, “When women make up their mind, there is nothing you can do. [When they come together, they make a difference].” She said women are writing their own stories day to day. She joked, some are writing The Days of Our Lives; some are writing As the World Turns or Bold and the Beautiful.

“As we celebrate women’s history, how are you helping younger women?” she asked. “What are you doing to make [the world] a better place?” (While the left hand is pulling us up, she said women’s right hand should be pulling up a younger woman).

“What will [this event] look like in 2040 or 2050?” she wondered, asking if women no longer would have to worry about equal pay for equal work, working twice as hard to prove themselves and would be living free of gender bias, and focusing time on the women behind them instead of fighting fights.

Before she left the stage, she was pinned with the deer pin (for Deerfield) and given a plaque. The honorees also received a pin, in addition to their awards. Their names were also placed on a special plaque.

The Butts Boulevard Global Creative Dance Group also did a wonderful dance presentation.

The 2018 Women’s History Hall of Fame Inductees:

(All women are pictured with Vice Mayor Gloria Battle).

Marti McGeary

Born in Philadelphia, PA, Marti McGeary served as president of the Future Teachers of America and was a charter member of the National Honor Society, as well as a representative to the Model United Nations at the University of Pennsylvania. In Deerfield, she has been active in The Original Save Our Beach organization, the Woman’s Club, for which she is currently president, and the Historical Society.

 

 

Ginger Alvarez

Ginger Alvarez started a neighborhood watch program, with her husband Ed, in 1990. She created a CB radio C.O.P. Program, is a member of C.E.R.T., helped to create the Citizen’s Action Group, served on the local Planning & Zoning Board, as well as the Broward County Municipal Advisory Board.

 

 

 

 

Kelly Hampton

After working managing agencies involved in foster care, Kelly Hampton served as Executive Director at the Century Village Master Management Company for four years. Now, she has become the Executive Director of the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

 

 

 

Bett Willett

Currently co-president of The Original Save Our Beach, Bett Willett also has been a past president for the Deerfield Woman’s Club. She has served for four years as a member of the Broward County Planning Council and has recently been appointed to the Deerfield Beach Educational Advisory Board.

 

 

 

 

Butts Boulevard Global Creative did a dance performance.

The Woman’s Club always comes out to support.

A few Woman’s Club members with keynote speaker Dr. Rosalind Osgood.

Community activist Terry Scott with keynote speaker Dr. Rosalind Osgood.

Judi Stanich chooses her brunch selections wisely. Catered by L&B Catering, the brunch included chicken and waffles, eggs and more breakfast items.

The event, held at the Johnny Tigner Community Center, brought in quite the crowd.

Vice Mayor Gloria Battle with keynote speaker Dr. Rosalind Osgood.

Dr. Osgood shares with the audience.

Ready for brunch…

The honorees’ names will be put on this plaque.

 

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