FLICKS: New Godzilla film — not so royal

Posted on 06 June 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

(Seated) Haruo Nakajima – the actor who first played Godzilla and continued the role for two decades. The recent Godzilla film was dedicated to this Japanese Legend.

Based on the box office performance of Aladdin and Godzilla: King of the Monsters, the 2019 summer blockbuster season will be filled with action, adventure and a little romance. Unlike the sustainability of an Adventures: Endgame, both Aladdin and Godzilla: King of the Monsters have a noticeable box office drop after the opening weekend.  

After the events of Kong: Skull Island and Godzilla: King of the Monsters, the world has learned that Titans are real. On one hand, the Titans are seen as a destructive force. Yet, after the havoc these monsters cause, the earth has become a greener place.

But those meddlesome members of Monarch (the crypto-zoological agency) have created a frequency radio device to track and control Godzilla, a fruitless enterprise.  Greedy environmental terrorists have decided to use the device to unleash dormant Titans and create world havoc. From Mexico to China, from Sedona to the final showdown in Boston, the monsters are unleashed and have stomped upon mankind. 

Unlike the classic Godzilla, where Japan was the scene of constant disaster, this new “King of the Monsters” is a global affair. Like a harem of insects, the human actors (Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga, Millie Bobby Brown & Charles Dance as the Master villain) deal with the rampaging monsters, who are actually a metaphor for their own domestic concerns.

As a monster maven, there is much to like about Godzilla: King of the Monsters. The creators acknowledge not only the myth of the standup fire-breathing lizard, but acknowledge local cultural myths from the seven continents. (Rodan rising out of a Mexican volcano owes a debt to the Aztec myth of Quetzalcoatl). Besides a cover song of the Blue Oyster Cult classic, there is the original theme from the first Godzilla film produced in 1954.

Cinema Dave with Blue Oyster Cult’s founding members, Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser and Eric Bloom. A cover version of their hit song, “Godzilla” was used in the new movie.

Yet, many of these tender mercies are lost in this overreaching new film. Eschewing actors wearing monster suits, there are computer-generated giant monsters who wreck havoc upon major cities with historical landmarks. Given that most of the monster battle scenes occur at night, one computerized action sequence looks the same as the other computerized action sequence. There is no sense of character development of the monsters, unlike the character growth of Kong from Kong: Skull Island.

As the closing credits infer, Kong and Godzilla are heading for a showdown next Memorial Day weekend 2020. Hopefully, the action sequences will follow the lead of Kong: Skull Island and will not be mired in darkness.  Writing a good review or a bad review, Cinema Dave will be at a Saturday Matinee with a gallon bucket of popcorn on his lap.

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FLICKS: Memorial Day movies & upcoming events

Posted on 30 May 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

On the strength of Aladdin, John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum and, of course, Avengers: Endgame, Memorial Day weekend enjoyed its best box office memory in recent memory. With Godzilla: King of the Monstersopening this weekend, one predicts box office optimism through the July 4th weekend and perhaps until Labor Day weekend. With the economy booking, happy days are here again for the American movie box office.

In honor of Memorial Day weekend, Cinema Dave hosted the John Ford-John Wayne collaboration, The Wings of Eagles, whichdoes not rank as high as other Ford-Wayne masterpieces such as Stagecoach, The Long Voyage Home or The Searchers. Yet, a subpar collaboration between Ford-Wayne is still better than most of the movies on the big screen today.

Based on biological evidence, The Wings of Eagles tells the tale of Frank “Spig” Wead, a Navy man who is a strong advocate for aviation in the Post World War I military culture. Since World War I was supposed to be the war to end all wars, there is a strong pacifist sentiment in America to curtain spending on military science. With strong understanding of public relations and marketing, Commander Wead and his team of Navy Aviators circumnavigate the globe and win the public over to their cause. A bit of a workaholic, Wead returns to his family on leave. When his child cries out one night, Wead falls down a flight of stairs and breaks his neck.

The first half of the movie is full of action and adventure. (The opening sequence was filmed at the Pensacola Naval Base), but the second half is pure drama as a man of action becomes a writer. 

As Frank Wead, John Wayne revealed a vulnerability that was rarely seen. In fact, the actor did not wear his toupee in later scenes featuring the aged Frank Weed. As the director, Admiral John Ford incorporated documentary footage of World War II battles that he was able to use in the climax. Like a fine wine, The Wings of Eagles has aged better than most modern releases and should play in regular rotation on Memorial Day weekends in the future.

Next Thursday, June 6 marks the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Invasion on Normandy Beach in France.  While the Steven Spielberg-Tom Hanks collaboration Saving Private Ryan is the best known film about the subject, The Longest Day is the most historically accurate film. Featuring an international all star cast (including World War II Veterans who actually served in the conflict such as Gert Fröbe (known for Goldfinger) and Eddie Albert), it is based on the book written by historian Cornelius Ryan. In addition to President Trump, the Florida State University’s Marching Chiefs Band will be performing at the ceremony in France.

Locally, the Deerfield Beach Percy White Library will be hosting a D-Day 75 Normandy concert with the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band on Thursday, June 6 at 2 p.m.

Having performed at many local venues including last November’s “Vet Fest,” the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band will feature the music of Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra and patriotic tunes.  On the following Thursday, June 13, historian Sally Ling will speak at the “Percy White Day Celebration.” Ms. Ling will discuss the enigma that is Percy White and talk about the history of the Deerfield Beach Community.

This performance is just one of many free programs that is featured in Broward County Library’s Summer Learning Program. Besides having fun reading and learning, there are opportunities to win prizes by registering for the Summer Learning Program at Deerfield Beach Percy White Library.Registration is free and the best part is you will not receive robocalls afterwards!

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FLICKS: The Tomorrow Man, Journey to a Mother’s Room & Memorial Day activities

Posted on 23 May 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Since the early 1980s, John Lithgow has been a consummate character actor on the big and little screen. He was the villain to John Travolta and Nancy Allen in Brian de Palma’s Blow Out, yet was Oscar nominated for his gentle role as a transsexual football player in The World According to Garp and as a small town gentleman who helps Debra Winger in the Oscar-winning Best Picture Terms of Endearment. Lithgow earned an Emmy as the nasty antagonist to the serial killer Dexter and as Professor Dick in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Lithgow portrays the lightness and the darkness of human nature with equal conviction.

Lithgow’s new movie, The Tomorrow Man, opens this Memorial Day weekend. In the midst of comic book movie openings, The Tomorrow Man may be the quietest movie opening this weekend. It is definitely the most unique one.

Ed (Lithgow) is on the high side of 60 and is obsessed with the future. While grocery shopping for supplies for his hidden bunker, he observes Ronnie (Blythe Danner). Like Ed, Ronnie buys bulk supplies and pays cash. Ed suspects they are kindred spirits and he introduces himself.

Ed and Ronnie hit it off and share meals, have discussions and late night drives in small town America. We learn that Ronnie has suffered much loss and has a tendency to hoard. As the relationship grows, Ed’s estranged son asks them to join the family for Thanksgiving Dinner. The meal is comically dark, but changes the tone of The Tomorrow Man.

As we learned in the movie Storm Boy, a good story has to go wrong before it gets better. The Tomorrow Man is a story about growth and the inevitable. Yet, the theme of embracing the present is so strong. With empathetic actors like Lithgow & Danner, The Tomorrow Man is a gem of a movie hidden on the big screen, much like the treasures found in Ronnie’s house of hoarding.

Opening last weekend with a visitation from the writer/director (Celia Rico Clavellino) and leading lady (Lola Duenas),Journey to a Mother’s Room is a Spanish language movie about a mother and daughter separation. For 90 plus minutes, this film features two women performing mundane activities. The daughter goes off to pursue her dream job in London, while the mother suffers from empty nest syndrome. Though this drama does drag, the climax provides a worthy payoff.

Of course, this is Memorial Day weekend and this columnist must acknowledge the PBS National Memorial Day Concert on Sunday night. The show is always epic and emotional, with this year’s emphasis on the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. Also, on Thursday, June 6 at 2 p.m., the Percy White Library in Deerfield Beach will host a free concert conducted by the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band. Expect some patriotic Big Band swing!

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FLICKS: Trial by Fire — a death row drama

Posted on 16 May 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

It was 45 years ago that my parents and I sat on the porch and watched Susan Hayward’s Oscar-winning performance in I Want to Live, which featured Barbara Graham’s final days before visiting the gas chamber. As an 11-year-old, I kept waiting for somebody to clear Graham’s name and she would be spared the execution. Albeit to say, there was never a sequel produced.

Released in 1995 and directed by Tim Robbins, Dead Man Walking earned Susan Sarandon an Oscar for her portrayal of Sister Helen Prejean, a spiritual adviser to inmates on death row. Like I Want to Live, Dead Man Walking is based on a true story with artistic license.

Opening tomorrow, Trial by Fire falls into similar “death row drama” and may be more haunting than the previous two Oscar winning movies. Itopens with simplicity. In one sustained shot, we see a girl playing in her front yard while a house in the background bursts into flames. A man runs out the smoky front door, runs to his car, then runs to a window screaming a child’s name. The fire department arrives. The fire claimed the children of Todd (Jack O’Connell) and Stacy Willingham (Emily Mead), a couple with domestic problems. Based on circumstantial evidence and his nonchalant behavior, Todd is sentenced to death row. Labeled a “baby killer,” Todd is placed on the lowest rung of inmate hierarchy.

During his final years, Todd develops a relationship with a prison guard (played by local actor Todd Allen Durkin) and develops a pen pal relationship with Elizabeth Gilbert (Laura Dern), a recent widow raising two children. With her legal experience, Elizabeth investigates Todd’s case and sees a reasonable doubt.

Director Edward Zwick has created his own unique “death row” drama. The dark elements of the story naturally permeate the story, but the sunny cinematography provides an interesting contrast. Clocking in slightly over two hours, this film meanders, yet provides many “little moments” of character development. In particular, the relationship between Todd and his security guard grows and blossoms like the relationship between Dr. Frankenstein and his monster.

Trial by Fire is a good movie, but a serious movie filled with darkness of the human soul. It is a definite contrast to most films on the big screen. If you need a “feel good” movie, go see Superpower Dogs 3D at the IMAX at the Museum of Discovery & Science in Ft. Lauderdale.

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FLICKS: “Ask Dr. Ruth”

Posted on 09 May 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

When adjusted for inflation, Avengers: Endgame has already joined the ranks of Gone with the Wind, Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and The Sound of Music in a mere 11 days. It is the No. 1 box office flick for 2019 and is not likely to be topped, even with the release of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker scheduled to debut in December.

With calmer fanfare, Ask Dr. Ruth also opened last weekend. It is a documentary about Ruth Westheimer, Ph.D, who burst into the public spotlight as the sex therapist to the nation in 1981. Everyone knows the kind little lady who could speak frankly about the intimacy of sex. Yet, much like a member of the Avengers, Dr. Ruth is part superhero.

The documentary begins and ends in Dr. Ruth’s Washington Heights apartment in New York City. Approaching her 90th birthday, we see this busy woman going about her daily routine in the spotlight of public speaking engagements.She appears to be never alone.

With the dawning of the AIDS crisis, Dr. Ruth’s candid, but cute, discussions about sexuality helped remove social stigmas. Given her sense of humor, she was a regular guest on the late night talk shows and chatted with Johnny Carson, David Letterman and NBC radio announcers. But, behind the laughs was a darker story.

Karola (Dr. Ruth’s first name) was born into a Jewish family in Germany during WWII. At the age of 9 1/2, her parents were taken to a labor camp. She, and the neighborhood children of her age, were put on a train and sent to Switzerland.

On May 8, 1945, when the orphanage announces the end of World War II, Karola comes to the realization that she won’t see her family again. These scenes featuring Karola’s youth are presented with animation that is simple and haunting.

Much like Dr. Ruth’s public persona, overall, Ask Dr. Ruth is lighthearted and humorous. Her pain, much like her politics, is not for public consumption. However, Ask Dr. Ruth provides answers for one who wishes to achieve an authentic life.

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Avengers: Endgame & new documentaries open

Posted on 02 May 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Approximately one year ago, I signed an oath that when I was invited to the screening of Avengers: Infinity War, I would not spoil the film experience for my readers. Except for one problem, I never received notification about the critics’ screening. Those critics who went to an early screening for the recent Avengers movies posted the entire synopsis that appeared on Wikipedia two days before the public had a chance to see these movies.

It really did not matter. I saw the film at the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Discovery and Science IMAX screen and had a wonderful experience with “true” fans. The IMAX with Laser created clear and concise visuals. Acoustically, the soaring score by Alan Silvestri taps some emotional beats, while classic rock and some big band tunes create emotional echoes of bygone days.

Capping off an 11 year, 22 film cycle now dubbed The Infinity Saga, Avengers: Endgameis a leisurely three hour movie with many pleasing moments. Without spoiling the new movie, this columnist can say that Thanos (James Brolin) did a very bad thing and the Avengers, headed by Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), are trying to correct the problem.

The pre-credits sequence opens with a shock as the Avengers, both young and old, assemble the team. Despite the Avengers’ heroics, the world remains a dark and depressing place. When Ant-Man/Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) suddenly appears, the Avengers create a unique solution to their problems.

Great writing provides Avengers: Endgame with many excellent payoffs. Given that we have known Captain America (Chris Evans), Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) for many years, the audience is given many emotional payoffs. While there are some cameo moments that invite cheers, the scenes involving family members (father, mother, unrequited lover) generate tears. Along the way, there are thrills, battles, humor and general popcorn-eating Saturday matinee afternoon fun. Somewhere in Heaven, Marvel Comic creators Stan Lee and Jack Kirby are smiling. Avengers: Endgame is excelsior.

Besides starring in Avengers: Endgame, Chris Evans narrates Superpower Dogs 3D, which is also playing at the Museum of Discovery and Science IMAX screen. Shot on multiple continents on land, sea and air, Superpower Dogs 3D explains the protective nature of the canine.  

With a full review next week, Ask Dr. Ruthopens this Friday. While best known as the cute little sex therapist with a German accent, Dr. Ruth Westheimer was a Holocaust survivor. This documentary will review the challenges the good doctor faced in the time of the AIDS crisis.

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FLICKS: The importance of the written word in poetry and motion pictures

Posted on 25 April 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

When Steven Spielberg won his first Oscar for Schindler’s List, he encouraged his motion picture colleagues to return to the written word. Deerfield Beach Percy White Library will feature the written word at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 25, with “Poetry 101 with Mrs. Powers.” In dedication of the National Poetry Month, Pam Powers, a Deerfield Beach Middle School Teacher with 37 years experience, comes out of retirement to teach a fun class on poetry. If the program is a success, we hope to have it again next year!

Spielberg created two motion pictures that broke records for the biggest box office records for all time, Jurassic Park and E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. The fact that these two motion pictures play on regular television rotation is a testament to the importance of the written word when creating big screen spectacular.

At the recent Spooky Empire Retro Convention [March 22 to 24 in Orlando], Dee Wallace, Henry Thomas, Robert MacNaughton and Robert Demeritt held an E.T. Reunion and reminisced about the production of this blockbuster champion. It was during the production of Raiders of the Lost Ark, that Spielberg discussed his feelings of loneliness to Harrison Ford’s girlfriend, Melissa Mathison, a screenwriter. From this discussion, the two forged the story of E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial.

Thirty-eight years after the production of ET, one can tell the cast still genuinely enjoy each other’s company and spoke fondly of their absentee actress, Drew Barrymore. Barrymore introduced MacNaughton to his wife. Since she was the youngest child on the set (aged 6), Barrymore was mentored by Wallace on the set. Wallace was concerned that the child actress could not differentiate the differences between fantasy and reality.

The boys were a different story. Being the leading man, the success of E.T. rested on 10 year-old Henry Thomas, who found escape through playing video games in Spielberg’s office. Being 14 years old, MacNaughton admitted that he and his peers (among them, C. Thomas Howell) had a crush on Dee Wallace, especially when she wore the “cat suit” during the Halloween sequence. Dee Wallace blushed in amazement as she heard some of these stories for the first time.

Despite the cynicism of the Hollywood mentality, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial has endured as a cultural icon. One modestly produced film has endured for almost four decades.

After “Poetry 101 with Mrs. Powers” this afternoon, Avengers: Endgame opens to many sold-out movie theaters [official release date is Friday]. Besides being the conclusion of a 21 motion picture film cycle, this new film is the culmination of 80 years of comic book myth inspired by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee. These are good years for good stories, but it is extremely important to remember that it begins with the written word.

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FLICKS: See Great Bear Rainforest 3D on Eddie Albert Day

Posted on 18 April 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

This Monday, April 22 marks the 113th birthday of actor Eddie Albert. Albert’s career spanned six decades as a leading man and as a character actor. He was Oscar nominated for Roman Holiday in 1954 and for The Heartbreak Kid 19 years later.  While a costar to actors like John Wayne, Ronald Reagan and Burt Reynolds, Albert is best remembered for his television show Green Acres, in which he, Eva Gabor and Arnold Ziffel starred in 170 episodes.

During the final season of Green Acres, he became politically active with environmental issues for the remainder of his life. TV Guide called him “an ecological Paul Revere” for his work with the Boy Scouts of America, serving on the Department of Energy’s Advisory Board, growing an organic garden in his backyard and founding the City Children’s Farms for inner city children. He also participated in the creation of “Earth Day,” in which organizers honor him by holding this event on the actor’s birthday.

The preservation of the environment is the responsibility of the current generation, who are merely stewards of the land for future generations. Forty years ago, broadcast television did a better job presenting environmental science to the public, minus the politicization. Fortunately, a documentary like Great Bear Rainforest 3D is still being produced and can be seen on a very big screen.

Set in British Columbia near the Alaska Peninsular, Great Bear Rainforest 3D is currently on rotation at the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Discovery and Science on the 6-story IMAX screen. Narrated by Ryan Reynolds, this film features overwhelming visuals of a land with very little human contact.

The only human contact is the indigenous people who live off the land with a symbiotic relationship with the bears and the land. Both creature’s diets thrive on the salmon swimming upstream.  With technical precision, this 10 minute sequence covers much drama. One key sequence features a Mama Grizzly Bear attempting to feed herself and her cubs while fending off a greedy male bear. Upon catching a fish, there is a pretty grisly sequence in which a bear skins and devours a salmon that is still half alive.

The star of this filmis Mox, a white bear. To the Native Americans, Mox is the spirit bear of the land. While the science is real and the cinematography is remarkable, this film presented an understated reason why religion is variably part of science.

As we have tragically learned from Notre Dame Cathedral this week, it was the science of neglect that caused the fire, a chemistry of elements that ignited the blaze [lack of fire prevention safeguards]. Yet, when the inferno was doused, the image of a cross illuminated through the darkness and smoke.

Have a happy and thoughtful Passover, Earth Day, Eddie Albert Day and Happy Easter.

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FLICKS: The Chaperone opens, Game of Thrones party, Plan for Avengers: Endgame now!

Posted on 11 April 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

After decades of watching The Three Stooges on television, one of the Farrelly Brothers admitted that while Curly and Moe were usually the center of attention, they found that Larry may have been the most important Stooge. The Farrelly Brothers credit him as the best actor who supported every scene that he was in. It was Larry’s job to keep the focus on Moe poking Curly in the eyes for comedic effect.

Opening this weekend, The Chaperone is the story about somebody who is not the center of attention, yet is an individual who keeps many disparate people together. Norma (Elizabeth McGovern) is a reliable individual. She is married to Alan Carlisle (Campbell Scott) who is a public figure in Kansas and they are patrons of the arts. While catching a dance recital featuring Young Louise Brooks (Haley Lu Richardson), Backstage, Mother Brooks asks Norma to chaperone Young Louise to New York City to take dance classes with the Denishawn Academy.

While The Chaperone could divert attention to the legendary silent screen star Louise Brooks, director Michael Engler keeps the focus on the title character. We learn that Norma was an orphan from the big city raised by nuns and relocated to Kansas. Married young, Norma confronts secrets from her past and current domestic woes. For Norma, chaperoning Louise Brooks is the least of her problems.

Given her Oscar-nominated role as the wild Evelyn Nesbit from Ragtime, released 38 years ago, Elizabeth McGovern shines as straitlaced Norma. She is the eye of the hurricane and the two performances, nearly four decades apart, bookend McGovern’s underrated talent as an actress. The Chaperone is good drama that celebrates good deeds under pressure.

On a more expansive note, Game of Thrones opens its final season this Sunday evening. While people are binge watching the previous seven seasons, Savor Cinema (503 SE 6 St., in Ft. Lauderdale) plans a season premier party starting at 7:30 p.m. Perhaps an evening of debauchery would be a more accurate description since flagons of ale, barrels of wine, Wildfire shots and Lannister turkey legs, and other dragon dishes, will be consumed within the John Mager Courtyard. Dress Gothic chic. Free parking at the courthouse garage. Sundays meters are free too. Party tickets: $20 FLIFF Members/$25 non-members, includes complimentary drinks and food!

Watching television shows in movie theaters is nothing new. When M*A*S*H ended its 11 year broadcast run on the CBS Network in February 1983, parties were held and people went to civic centers to watch the final episode.

Yet, it is fascinating how small-screened television is driving the markets for big screened entertainment.

Speaking of big screen, the biggest screen in the land, Museum of Discovery and Science – IMAX’s 6-story-high screen has already sold-out screenings of Avengers: Endgame, which opens in two weeks. However, there are some great documentaries that will be playing on the big screen, most notably Great Bear Rainforest and Great Barrier Reef. For those in search of more quieter dramas, check out The Chaperone this weekend.

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Storm Boy opens this weekend, Dumbo deserved more love

Posted on 04 April 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Despite being No. 1 in the box office last weekend, Dumbo disappointed in the box office numbers. Earning only 25 percent of its production costs, Dumbo faces much competition this spring break season with Shazam!, Pet Sematary and Storm Boy opening this weekend. The sad thing is that Dumbo is fine family entertainment directed by Tim Burton. While a darker version of the popular animated motion picture from 1941, this modern version of Dumbo eschews talking and singing animals. The new film focuses on a family and a small business facing a financial crisis.

Set in Sarasota, circa 1919, the film opens with the Medici Brothers Circus launching their annual barnstorming tour through the American Heartland. While in Joplin, Missouri (Walt Disney’s hometown), Ringmaster Medici (Danny Devito) welcomes the return of his ace trick rider (Colin Farrell) to his family and the birth of a baby elephant with big ears.

The story is simple and conflict will ensue. However, it is the attention to detail that makes Dumbo so special. Music that animals sang to in the first movie is used as heartfelt musical cues. “Baby Mine” is rendered with sideshow performers (bearded lady, strong man) playing a flute and ukulele, while resting between shows. Despite some mean behavior and a jump scare, Dumbo is a sweet movie to take children to if only to see how a family sticks together to solve problems.

Storm Boy opens this weekend and contains many of the same themes as Dumbo with far less special effects. Based on the novella by Colin Thiele, Storm Boy is a rite of passage story that is set on the Australian coast. Geoffrey Rush (who also produced) portrays Mike Kingley, a retiring business man who is concerned that his son wants to pave paradise and put up a parking lot, upsetting the economical balance of the beach front.

When reuniting with his granddaughter, Kingley reflects upon his youth with three pelicans, in particular Mr. Percival, an orphan pelican.  Mr. Percival and Kingley have a series of encounters on the island and become local celebrities.

“A good story has to go wrong before it gets better,” Kingley tells his granddaughter late in the film. It is sad, but Storm Boy concludes on a life affirming note. In fact, it will inspire you to go for an early morning walk on Deerfield Beach to watch and observe the birds on our beach.

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