FLICKS: A Golden Anniversary of Apollo 11

Posted on 18 July 2019 by LeslieM

This Saturday, July 20 marks the 50 Year Anniversary of when man first walked on the moon. For those who watched it that Sunday night on black and white television sets, it is a memory to cherish. For the post moon landing generations raised on Star Trek, Star Wars and the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the question is “So what is the big deal?”

The question raises the fine line between fantasy and reality. The current generation suckled by chronic video games, do not appreciate that a rocket ship with breadboard computers had the computer memory capacity of less than 5 percent of a current home computer. Circa 1992, I will never forget watching people wait in line for five hours in a walk-through Star Trek television exhibit, while ignoring Charles Lindbergh’s airplane, The Spirit of Saint Louis and the Columbia, the Command Module from Apollo 11, the mission that first put man on the moon.

Since October 23, 2007, the Broward County Main Library in Ft. Lauderdale is the steward of a moon rock sliver, which was donated by Susan Eisele Black, the wife of the late Apollo 7 astronaut Donn F. Eisele. The Eisele family and astronaut Walter Cunningham were in attendance. Besides the moon rock sliver, the sixth floor of the Main Library features a 20 minute film about the Apollo 7 mission, along with relics from NASA with bookmarks about astronomy.

This Saturday, June 20 at 11 a.m., the Deerfield Beach Percy White will host a screening of a free movie. It deals with that subject. Due to license agreements, we can not disclose the title of the movie. Suffice it to say, the movie deals with the first man to walk on the moon. At 1:30 p.m., the Pompano Beach Library will be hosting a Watch Party with an edible craft. All ages with care givers are invited to attend.

Besides directing the Oscar nominated Apollo 11, Ron Howard also produced the underrated documentary In the Shadow of the Moon. Featuring color footage forgotten in NASA vaults, this colorful documentary is thrilling to watch. Featuring most of the astronauts who flew in the moon missions, the narration is both funny and inspirational.

Produced by Tom Hanks, From the Earth to the Moon is a 13 part miniseries that earned HBO multiple Emmy awards. While most of the episodes focus on space travel, this fantastic miniseries also broached topics like geology, changing media ethics and the impact of the astronauts’ wives. These three video productions are available through the Broward County Library.

Believers of conspiracy theories and #FakeNews often deny that man walked on the moon, although high powered telescopes have located the six American flags planted on the lunar surface. For all of the criticism about our nation, the United States of America is the only country that successfully put 12 men on the moon and returned them safely to earth.  It is a big deal.

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The Reports on Sarah and Saleem opens while Spider-Man: Far from Home dominates the box office

Posted on 11 July 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Inspired by true events, The Reports on Sarah and Saleem opens this weekend. It is a simple story about infidelity, and a love triangle that leads to a love rectangle. Tension builds when the affair sets off a potential civil war of international dimensions, for one lover is from Israel and the other lover is a Palestinian. 

With very little surprise, Spider-Man: Far from Home dominated the 4th of July holiday weekend. This epic Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movie ties up the loose ends of Avengers: Endgame, which is on the verge of supplanting Avatar as the worldwide box office champion of all time. This is the final Marvel Cinematic Universe movie of Phase 3 of a 24 film cycle and provides a fine denouement. The success of these MCU movies is that each film has its own unique story.

After the world changing events of Avengers: Endgame, high school student Peter Parker (Tom Holland) tries to return to a normal life and court the girl of his dreams, MJ (Zendaya). Being science nerds, the couple is excited to leave Queens and attend a science trip in Venice, Italy. Feeling a need to unwind, Parker attempts to take a vacation from his alter-ego, Spider-Man.

Like being a police officer, there is no rest for the weary, and Peter must put on his superhero suit to battle an Elemental monster from the Grand Canal of Venice. While performing his heroics to protect his classmates, Parker encounters Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal), who easily defeats the Water Monster. When Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) enters the scene, an alliance between Mysterio and Spider-Man is suggested.

Spider-Man: Far from Home is a timely motion picture. One of the themes is that of #FakeNews and one has to wait to see the end of the credits is to see all of how this theme plays out.

Grief has always been a strong theme in the life of Peter Parker. The loss of his mentor from Avengers: Endgame is prominent. However, there is an acknowledgement of the dearly departed Uncle Ben, the individual most influential in the creation of Spider-Man. 

This is the last MCU movie until Phase 4 begins in 2020.Spider-Man: Far from Home will only be on the Museum of Discovery IMAX (in Ft. Lauderdale) screen for another week, before The Lion King takes over. See the new Spider-Man on this six-story screen. The most breathtaking scenes are not the special effects, but the wide angle shots of the Venice canals in Italy.

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Toni Morrison documentary opens this week

Posted on 05 July 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

As I write this week’s edition of Flicks, Mom & I have been traveling through Florida, Georgia and Alabama for a family reunion. Once north of Orlando, I was pleased to discover that a sense of “Southern Hospitality” has not been lost among the people there.

There were plenty of stories to be told. It seemed that each waiter/waitress at the restaurants had a story to tell about their community or family. At our family reunion, we kept the memory alive of our dearly departed. My brother’s research through Ancestry.com revealed family connections to the Revolutionary War and Abraham Lincoln. As the United States of America celebrates 243 years of freedom, we are reminded that this nation truly represents Unity through Diversity.

What was noteworthy was the lack of movie theaters during my recent odyssey. I’ve always read the marquees to see what was playing on the local big screen. There was no sign of Avengers: Endgame or Toy Story 4 or Godzilla: King of the Monsters.

It seems appropriate that the documentaryToni Morrison:The Pieces I Amopens this 4th of July weekend. Born in Ohio in 1931, Toni Morrison is the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Peace Prize and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is the author of The Bluest Eye, The Song of Solomon and Beloved, the latter of which caught the interest of Oprah Winfrey.

Oprah produced and starred in a movie version of Beloved which co-starred Danny Glover and Thandie Newton. A ghost story of sorts, Beloved focuses on a former slave who is haunted by a poltergeist who may be her dearly deceased daughter. Despite heavy marketing hype, Beloved bombed at the box office 21 years ago.  

As a documentary, Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am, overlooks this financial failure, but Oprah does share some anecdotes about meeting and working with the author. As a writer, there is much to learn from this documentary. For instance, while staring out at a pier by a lake, Morrison had a vision of a young woman crawling out of the dock. Morrison questioned the vision and wanted to know what happened next. This image was the birth of Beloved.

Party hearty this 4th of July weekend!

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FLICKS: Toy Story 4 is fun, Annabelle Comes Home, Spider-Man: Far From Home and Beatles’s Yesterday open this weekend

Posted on 27 June 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave
http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

While waiting for Toy Story 4 to begin, this columnist sat through a series of previews — all films starring computer animation. It has been 24 years since the original Toy Story — what was unique, is now common place. Beyond the special effects and paying big time celebrities a load of money, computerized animation films have now entered the law of diminishing returns.  It is storytelling and respect for the written word, that will redeem the motion picture industry, both live action and computer animation.

Toy Story 4 suffers being the first film since Toy Story 3, the emotional and satisfying cap to the original Toy Story trilogy. Toy Story 4 continues the adventures of Woody (voiced by Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and the ensemble of toys, under new management from a new owner, this time a little girl who is beginning kindergarten.

The little girl is filled with fear, so Woody sneaks in her backpack to assist her first day of school. Through the magic of improvisation, the little girl creates a new friend — Forky, a deformed looking spoon with pipe cleaner arms and mismatched eyes. Being a bit like the Frankenstein monster, Woody is forced to tutor Forky about the importance of being the little girl’s favorite toy.

Toy Story 4 provides entertainment for children of all ages, both young and old.  There are not emotional devastating moments like in Toy Story 3, but Toy Story 4 has a lighter touch with profound theories about personal attachment, maturity and growth.  There are also some Indiana Jones thrills featuring Woody, Buzz and a new character. Toy Story 4 does provide Saturday matinee popcorn eating fun, despite a sinister ventriloquist puppet that stalks Woody, Buzz and Little Bo Peep.

An evil doll returns to the big screen this weekend, when Annabelle Comes Home.  As part of “The Conjuring” series of movies, Annabelle is a demon doll who has made appearances in four movies. Annabelle appears to do nothing but to sit and stare, but this horcrux of evil inspires humans to commit murder of innocence.  

Ironically, the evil Annabelle Comes Home when the heroic Spider-Man: Far from Home opens the same weekend. Fortunately, this Marvel Comics superhero will be first appearing at the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Discovery and Science IMAX Screen on a limited engagement. This Spider-Man installment looks at the Marvel Comic Universe after the events of the recent Avengers: Endgame, which is still appearing on the big screen this weekend.

Last, but not least, Yesterday opens this weekend. This film is about the world as if the British rock band never existed.

On Sunday, July 7, The School of Rock Pompano will perform at the Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood at 2 p.m. to prove the existence of the Beatles. This Band is set to perform five Beatles songs. Yours truly is scheduled to sing “Back in the USSR” and celebrate drummer Ringo Starr’s 79th birthday.

Cinema Dave with his School of Rock Pompano bandmates; L-R, Mario, Anthony Valrino (Musical Director) Earl, Mike, Stan, Chi Chi, Kenzie, Faye & Larry.

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FLICKS: The Spy Behind Home Plate

Posted on 20 June 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave
http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

With the monsoon rain we have experienced as of late, it would be easy to miss the summer solstice this week, the longest day of the year (Friday, June 21). School is out, the Stanley Cup and basketball championships have been decided, and all that remains is baseball and the movies.
The Spy Behind Home Plate is a documentary that opens this weekend. It is the story of Mo Berg, the son of Ukrainian Jewish immigrants who went to Princeton University in New Jersey, but who really wanted to be a baseball player. While his Jewish parents were distressed that playing games was more of a priority than getting a real job, Mo’s love of baseball provided a fringe benefit for the United States of America entering World War II.
Graduating Magna Cum Laude, Berg played catcher in the 1930s. He had a talent for grasping foreign languages, which became the key to understanding foreign cultures when Major League Baseball went on international tours.
Berg toured Japan. As the Nation of Japan was becoming imperial, he secreted a camera and took pictures of city geography. These photos were eventually used by the war department and were utilized during General Doolittle’s bombing campaign that lasted 30 seconds over Tokyo.
Like Woody Allen’s Zelig and Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, The Spy Behind Home Plate shows Berg meeting many celebrities. He toured with the Great Bambino — Babe Ruth, and dated the legendary baseball player’s daughter. When World War II concluded, Berg took tea with Professor Albert Einstein in Princeton.
There is a great dichotomy between the public persona of Mo Berg and with the man who worked under Colonel Donovan, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s request. The film reveals photos of Berg’s radio game show appearances on Information Please! while developing espionage profiles with Ian Fleming, the author of the original 13 James Bond novels.
With The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg and Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg, documentarian (and New York Mets fan), Alvina Kempner has scored the hat trick with The Spy Behind Home Plate. This is a good movie to celebrate this year’s summer solstice.

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FLICKS: Pavarotti doesn’t open, enjoy some laughs with Stan & Ollie on DVD

Posted on 13 June 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Hyped by social media marketing, I was looking forward to seeing Ron Howard’s documentary Pavarotti. Unfortunately, this documentary seemed to open in only major cities that have newspaper critics that write syndicated movie reviews. The reviews for Pavarotti were mediocre but, nonetheless, I hope to see this movie on the big screen, since Ron Howard knows how to direct [films about music]. Three years ago Ron Howard released The Beatles: Eight Days a Week, a documentary about The Beatles tour from 1962-1966.

The beauty of movies is that there are millions of unwatched films, even for a “movie maven” like Cinema Dave. Last May, Deerfield Beach Percy White experimented with a Wednesday afternoon series titled “Comedy Club.” Presented in glorious black & white film stock, these films featured W.C. Fields, Edgar Bergen, Charlie McCarthy, Stan Laurel & Oliver Hardy. The laughs were sincere and this library is likely to resurrect this program in the autumn.

Announced for production two years ago, Stan & Ollie was quietly released during awards season. As Oliver Hardy, John C. Reilly received high praise and an award for his portrayal of the chubby half of this legendary comedy team. Besides playing Stan Laurel, Steve Coogan reunited with Philomena screenwriter Jeff Pope.

Stan & Ollie is a loving portrayal of the comedy team’s swansong. It is more of a memory piece than an accurate portrayal of history.  Based on the biographies written by John McCabe and William K. Everson, the conflict between Stan and Ollie was dramatized for artistic license.   

The fictional conflict is based on Stan’s feelings of betrayal for Ollie doing freelance work. The opposite was true…Stan encouraged Ollie to accept employment with Harry Langdon in Zenobia and John Wayne in The Fighting Kentuckian. While assigned together as work mates, the two men developed an enduring friendship that continued for the rest of their lives. 

Beyond Coogan and Reilly’s sincere performance, Stan & Ollie duplicates the team’s onstage magic. The fine line between fantasy and reality is crossed frequently, when a serious moment of human drama is transformed into a comedy gag that is executed by Laurel & Hardy. Case in point: Stan & Ollie get into a serious argument with their wives at a cocktail party with financial benefactors. The fight ends with a slapstick retaliation from Stan. The financial benefactors laugh, not knowing the serious implications of the conflict.

For those celebrating Father’s Day with their dear ol’ dads, take advantage of having some laughs with the old man. There are plenty of modern comedies that promote grossness and obscenity, but comedians like Charlie Chaplin, The Marx Brothers, W.C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy have provided family entertainment for over a century on the silver screen. Check out Stan & Ollie or any classic comedy for a successful Father’s Day weekend.

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FLICKS: New Godzilla film — not so royal

Posted on 06 June 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

(Seated) Haruo Nakajima – the actor who first played Godzilla and continued the role for two decades. The recent Godzilla film was dedicated to this Japanese Legend.

Based on the box office performance of Aladdin and Godzilla: King of the Monsters, the 2019 summer blockbuster season will be filled with action, adventure and a little romance. Unlike the sustainability of an Adventures: Endgame, both Aladdin and Godzilla: King of the Monsters have a noticeable box office drop after the opening weekend.  

After the events of Kong: Skull Island and Godzilla: King of the Monsters, the world has learned that Titans are real. On one hand, the Titans are seen as a destructive force. Yet, after the havoc these monsters cause, the earth has become a greener place.

But those meddlesome members of Monarch (the crypto-zoological agency) have created a frequency radio device to track and control Godzilla, a fruitless enterprise.  Greedy environmental terrorists have decided to use the device to unleash dormant Titans and create world havoc. From Mexico to China, from Sedona to the final showdown in Boston, the monsters are unleashed and have stomped upon mankind. 

Unlike the classic Godzilla, where Japan was the scene of constant disaster, this new “King of the Monsters” is a global affair. Like a harem of insects, the human actors (Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga, Millie Bobby Brown & Charles Dance as the Master villain) deal with the rampaging monsters, who are actually a metaphor for their own domestic concerns.

As a monster maven, there is much to like about Godzilla: King of the Monsters. The creators acknowledge not only the myth of the standup fire-breathing lizard, but acknowledge local cultural myths from the seven continents. (Rodan rising out of a Mexican volcano owes a debt to the Aztec myth of Quetzalcoatl). Besides a cover song of the Blue Oyster Cult classic, there is the original theme from the first Godzilla film produced in 1954.

Cinema Dave with Blue Oyster Cult’s founding members, Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser and Eric Bloom. A cover version of their hit song, “Godzilla” was used in the new movie.

Yet, many of these tender mercies are lost in this overreaching new film. Eschewing actors wearing monster suits, there are computer-generated giant monsters who wreck havoc upon major cities with historical landmarks. Given that most of the monster battle scenes occur at night, one computerized action sequence looks the same as the other computerized action sequence. There is no sense of character development of the monsters, unlike the character growth of Kong from Kong: Skull Island.

As the closing credits infer, Kong and Godzilla are heading for a showdown next Memorial Day weekend 2020. Hopefully, the action sequences will follow the lead of Kong: Skull Island and will not be mired in darkness.  Writing a good review or a bad review, Cinema Dave will be at a Saturday Matinee with a gallon bucket of popcorn on his lap.

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FLICKS: Memorial Day movies & upcoming events

Posted on 30 May 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

On the strength of Aladdin, John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum and, of course, Avengers: Endgame, Memorial Day weekend enjoyed its best box office memory in recent memory. With Godzilla: King of the Monstersopening this weekend, one predicts box office optimism through the July 4th weekend and perhaps until Labor Day weekend. With the economy booking, happy days are here again for the American movie box office.

In honor of Memorial Day weekend, Cinema Dave hosted the John Ford-John Wayne collaboration, The Wings of Eagles, whichdoes not rank as high as other Ford-Wayne masterpieces such as Stagecoach, The Long Voyage Home or The Searchers. Yet, a subpar collaboration between Ford-Wayne is still better than most of the movies on the big screen today.

Based on biological evidence, The Wings of Eagles tells the tale of Frank “Spig” Wead, a Navy man who is a strong advocate for aviation in the Post World War I military culture. Since World War I was supposed to be the war to end all wars, there is a strong pacifist sentiment in America to curtain spending on military science. With strong understanding of public relations and marketing, Commander Wead and his team of Navy Aviators circumnavigate the globe and win the public over to their cause. A bit of a workaholic, Wead returns to his family on leave. When his child cries out one night, Wead falls down a flight of stairs and breaks his neck.

The first half of the movie is full of action and adventure. (The opening sequence was filmed at the Pensacola Naval Base), but the second half is pure drama as a man of action becomes a writer. 

As Frank Wead, John Wayne revealed a vulnerability that was rarely seen. In fact, the actor did not wear his toupee in later scenes featuring the aged Frank Weed. As the director, Admiral John Ford incorporated documentary footage of World War II battles that he was able to use in the climax. Like a fine wine, The Wings of Eagles has aged better than most modern releases and should play in regular rotation on Memorial Day weekends in the future.

Next Thursday, June 6 marks the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Invasion on Normandy Beach in France.  While the Steven Spielberg-Tom Hanks collaboration Saving Private Ryan is the best known film about the subject, The Longest Day is the most historically accurate film. Featuring an international all star cast (including World War II Veterans who actually served in the conflict such as Gert Fröbe (known for Goldfinger) and Eddie Albert), it is based on the book written by historian Cornelius Ryan. In addition to President Trump, the Florida State University’s Marching Chiefs Band will be performing at the ceremony in France.

Locally, the Deerfield Beach Percy White Library will be hosting a D-Day 75 Normandy concert with the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band on Thursday, June 6 at 2 p.m.

Having performed at many local venues including last November’s “Vet Fest,” the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band will feature the music of Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra and patriotic tunes.  On the following Thursday, June 13, historian Sally Ling will speak at the “Percy White Day Celebration.” Ms. Ling will discuss the enigma that is Percy White and talk about the history of the Deerfield Beach Community.

This performance is just one of many free programs that is featured in Broward County Library’s Summer Learning Program. Besides having fun reading and learning, there are opportunities to win prizes by registering for the Summer Learning Program at Deerfield Beach Percy White Library.Registration is free and the best part is you will not receive robocalls afterwards!

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FLICKS: The Tomorrow Man, Journey to a Mother’s Room & Memorial Day activities

Posted on 23 May 2019 by LeslieM

By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

Since the early 1980s, John Lithgow has been a consummate character actor on the big and little screen. He was the villain to John Travolta and Nancy Allen in Brian de Palma’s Blow Out, yet was Oscar nominated for his gentle role as a transsexual football player in The World According to Garp and as a small town gentleman who helps Debra Winger in the Oscar-winning Best Picture Terms of Endearment. Lithgow earned an Emmy as the nasty antagonist to the serial killer Dexter and as Professor Dick in 3rd Rock from the Sun. Lithgow portrays the lightness and the darkness of human nature with equal conviction.

Lithgow’s new movie, The Tomorrow Man, opens this Memorial Day weekend. In the midst of comic book movie openings, The Tomorrow Man may be the quietest movie opening this weekend. It is definitely the most unique one.

Ed (Lithgow) is on the high side of 60 and is obsessed with the future. While grocery shopping for supplies for his hidden bunker, he observes Ronnie (Blythe Danner). Like Ed, Ronnie buys bulk supplies and pays cash. Ed suspects they are kindred spirits and he introduces himself.

Ed and Ronnie hit it off and share meals, have discussions and late night drives in small town America. We learn that Ronnie has suffered much loss and has a tendency to hoard. As the relationship grows, Ed’s estranged son asks them to join the family for Thanksgiving Dinner. The meal is comically dark, but changes the tone of The Tomorrow Man.

As we learned in the movie Storm Boy, a good story has to go wrong before it gets better. The Tomorrow Man is a story about growth and the inevitable. Yet, the theme of embracing the present is so strong. With empathetic actors like Lithgow & Danner, The Tomorrow Man is a gem of a movie hidden on the big screen, much like the treasures found in Ronnie’s house of hoarding.

Opening last weekend with a visitation from the writer/director (Celia Rico Clavellino) and leading lady (Lola Duenas),Journey to a Mother’s Room is a Spanish language movie about a mother and daughter separation. For 90 plus minutes, this film features two women performing mundane activities. The daughter goes off to pursue her dream job in London, while the mother suffers from empty nest syndrome. Though this drama does drag, the climax provides a worthy payoff.

Of course, this is Memorial Day weekend and this columnist must acknowledge the PBS National Memorial Day Concert on Sunday night. The show is always epic and emotional, with this year’s emphasis on the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. Also, on Thursday, June 6 at 2 p.m., the Percy White Library in Deerfield Beach will host a free concert conducted by the Senior Moments Unforgettable Band. Expect some patriotic Big Band swing!

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FLICKS: Trial by Fire — a death row drama

Posted on 16 May 2019 by LeslieM


By “Cinema” Dave

http://cinemadave.livejournal.com

It was 45 years ago that my parents and I sat on the porch and watched Susan Hayward’s Oscar-winning performance in I Want to Live, which featured Barbara Graham’s final days before visiting the gas chamber. As an 11-year-old, I kept waiting for somebody to clear Graham’s name and she would be spared the execution. Albeit to say, there was never a sequel produced.

Released in 1995 and directed by Tim Robbins, Dead Man Walking earned Susan Sarandon an Oscar for her portrayal of Sister Helen Prejean, a spiritual adviser to inmates on death row. Like I Want to Live, Dead Man Walking is based on a true story with artistic license.

Opening tomorrow, Trial by Fire falls into similar “death row drama” and may be more haunting than the previous two Oscar winning movies. Itopens with simplicity. In one sustained shot, we see a girl playing in her front yard while a house in the background bursts into flames. A man runs out the smoky front door, runs to his car, then runs to a window screaming a child’s name. The fire department arrives. The fire claimed the children of Todd (Jack O’Connell) and Stacy Willingham (Emily Mead), a couple with domestic problems. Based on circumstantial evidence and his nonchalant behavior, Todd is sentenced to death row. Labeled a “baby killer,” Todd is placed on the lowest rung of inmate hierarchy.

During his final years, Todd develops a relationship with a prison guard (played by local actor Todd Allen Durkin) and develops a pen pal relationship with Elizabeth Gilbert (Laura Dern), a recent widow raising two children. With her legal experience, Elizabeth investigates Todd’s case and sees a reasonable doubt.

Director Edward Zwick has created his own unique “death row” drama. The dark elements of the story naturally permeate the story, but the sunny cinematography provides an interesting contrast. Clocking in slightly over two hours, this film meanders, yet provides many “little moments” of character development. In particular, the relationship between Todd and his security guard grows and blossoms like the relationship between Dr. Frankenstein and his monster.

Trial by Fire is a good movie, but a serious movie filled with darkness of the human soul. It is a definite contrast to most films on the big screen. If you need a “feel good” movie, go see Superpower Dogs 3D at the IMAX at the Museum of Discovery & Science in Ft. Lauderdale.

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