Tag Archive | "Rachel Galvin"

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Oceanic opens

Posted on 05 September 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Right near the newly renovated Pompano Pier, a much-anticipated restaurant has now opened. Oceanic restaurant, with its modern look and great view had its grand opening party on Thursday, Aug. 29. Some stayed downstairs to enjoy delicious passed hors d’ oeuvres or fresh seafood. Others grabbed a Dorian-tini from the luge there and went upstairs to see the view of the ocean from the balcony and see the large room that can be rented out for private parties, including weddings. (They also have a bride’s room). In the middle of the fun, a belly dancer swayed through the crowd balancing candles and later a sword on her head while juggling fire, causing quite a stir. Owner Lou Moshakos christened the restaurant by throwing plates with his grandson, showcasing his Greek roots. Opa!

Lou originally opened a restaurant 41 years ago in Deerfield Beach called Seafood Shanty with his wife Joy. They sold it in the 1980s. Today, their company, LM Restaurants, owns several restaurant concepts. Besides Oceanic here and also another one in North Carolina, they also have Vidrio, Bluewater Waterfront Grill, Hops Supply Co., Taverna Agora, Carolina Ale House and Henry’s. Their daughter Amber is now president of the company.

At this Oceanic, their culinary focus is on “fresh seafood, high quality steaks, creative bold flavors and sharing plates all at reasonable prices,” according to Joy, who also said they will have creative cocktails at their full bars.

One guest, Thetis Palamiotov couldn’t stop raving about the restaurant.

“The experience is above and beyond. They have great service,” she said.

Right next door to the restaurant, Joy said they are building another restaurant. It will be called Lucky Fish Beach Bar and will be beach casual with a Tahitian Tiki bar feel. In addition, they will be opening a Mediterranean style restaurant called Morea in the Paramount Building in Ft. Lauderdale (701 N. Ft. Lauderdale Beach Blvd.), which will be focused on sharing plates to promote conversation the way you often see in Mediterranean countries.

Katherine Goldfaden, director of Brands & Marketing, said that every restaurant opening they have, they always give 10 percent to a local nonprofit, and education is one of their biggest charity passions. In the case of opening Oceanic, they donated 10 percent of at least the first seven days of being open to Broward Education Foundation.

Oceanic restaurant is located at 250 N. Pompano Beach Blvd., in Pompano Beach. For more information, visit www.oceanicpompano.com.

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Sprouts Farmers Market Grand Opening

Posted on 31 August 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Bright and early, shoppers were eager to check out the brand new Sprouts Farmers Market which opened at 7 a.m. on Aug. 28. Danny Seo of NBC’s Naturally, Danny Seo hand stuffed bags featuring some of his favorite natural products to be given out to the first 100 people to enter the store.

Sprouts opened its first store in 2002 in Chandler, AZ and now has over 320 stores around the country. This newest location, at 930 S. Federal Hwy. in Deerfield Beach, is about 30,000 sq. ft. It makes for an intimate shopping experience but is expansive at the same time. You could easily spend hours exploring all the products.

They don’t consider themselves a specialty store, but rather an alternative to the regular grocery store. But their organic and conventional produce is at the heart of every store representing ¼ of the business. You can find fresh responsibly and sustainably caught seafood. They can even season the fish for you! They also have an in-house butcher and make their own sausages daily. Their beef, pork and chicken is fresh, never frozen with no fillers.

Don’t like to cook? Here you can find fresh pre-made meals, bento boxes, one-dish wonders ready to pop in the oven, plenty of frozen dinners, a salad bar and so much more. It is perfect for the person on-the-go who needs a quick meal. The Deerfield Beach store has the latest prototype of the expanded deli, which allows for more efficient customer service.

Hang out in the lounge area to grab a bite and use the free WiFi. Grab some wine or craft beer to take home. They also have Kombucha and cold brew on tap.

They don’t carry every brand name; but in the natural products, they carry so much more variety than the normal stores. Whether you are on the keto diet, are gluten free, paleo, whichever, they seem to have something for you. You can find a unique variety of products from plant-based yogurts to vegetable or seaweed pasta, to CBD products and more. Sprouts offers their own brand of some products at a lower cost too.

They have a wide range of sports nutritional products. You can also find vitamins, natural hair and skin products, essential oils and more. Team members go through ongoing training to understand the ins and outs of the products and trends.

The stores buy in bulk so they can pass the savings on to the customers. You can also buy items in bulk, or you can grab a bag and scoop your own trail mix, dried fruits, barley, beans and more. If you only need a pinch of spices, you can just take what you need. They even have a machine where you can push a button and grind your own peanut or almond butter.

“We have two decades of experience in making natural foods affordable and approachable. That’s what Sprouts is all about – making healthy living possible,” said Sprouts spokesperson Diego Romero.

The store has a money back guarantee. If you don’t like something, you can return it. They also offer samples of their products. They are always running different discounts. For the opening, they already were putting up BOGO signs.

“Even though it is a smaller store, when I was doing the TV show, I could find all my ingredients at Sprouts,” said Seo, who says he started talking about eating healthy and living green when no one else was doing it and now sees a cultural shift.

“Now, it isn’t [who is green] but just what shade of green are you?”

Sprouts Farmers Market is located at 930 S. Federal Hwy., in Deerfield Beach. For more information on Sprouts, visit www.sprouts.com or call 954-363-2070.

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Testing memory changes as we age — The Memory Disorder Center at Broward Health North

Posted on 31 August 2019 by LeslieM

Social Worker Jean Merget, counselor Veronica Pantuso, neurologist Hazel Wiley, DO; coordinator Milena Cedeno-Oblinger, RN, SCRN & Natasha Hall Towns, RN, of Broward Health North’s Memory Disorder Center.

By Rachel Galvin
Memory loss is an important concern as we age. Many younger people find themselves dealing with an older parent who is starting to forget things. The question is when does forgetting something here and there turn into dementia and what do you do if you or a parent has it? These are questions best answered by the experts.
At Broward Health North, they have a Memory Disorder Center where people can turn to get some answers. The best part is that having a memory test done is free and they keep the results on file for 10 years, so you can have it retaken in later years and see the difference. The test is simple and pretty quick. The social worker or counselor asks you some questions then has you conduct some tasks that involve following basic directions. You are given a score that helps them determine your memory.
What happens if the results are not normal? Well, then they can move onto determine the next course of action, including possible other tests that need to be taken, which may include an EEG, bloodwork, imaging of the brain, etc. There are different types of memory that they can further evaluate – Executive Functioning, auditory memory, visual memory, processing speed, concentration, attention and more.
Past age 75, everyone’s process of storing and recalling information takes more time. But dementia does not happen automatically as we age.
“As we age, the brain changes,” said neurologist Hazel Wiley, DO, who said it is proteins like Amyloid-beta and Tau that damage brain tissue over time. They are still researching the reason why proteins build up.
She added, “Just because you don’t have a problem now doesn’t mean you won’t have one later. High blood pressure, diabetes, kidney problems, tobacco use for years can cause brain changes and lead to a loss of neurons.”
The most common form of memory difficulty is dementia due to Alzheimer’s. One in 10 people over 64 have Alzheimer’s disease. But there are other types of dementia – Vascular Dementia, Dementia with Lewy Bodies and others.
“I don’t think there is someone who is not affected [by dementia in some way]. For Broward County, there are 41,000 people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s alone. Dementia is a broad category. Over 80 percent of dementia is Alzheimer’s. When you have high cholesterol, blood pressure, or drink or smoke too much, it causes damage to the arteries and you can develop vascular changes,” said Wiley.
It is important to be screened early for possible changes, something that most do not do. It isn’t until the senior starts making behavioral changes that family members or friends notice, and then an assessment is made.
Melina Cedeno-Oblinger, RN, SCRN, who is a coordinator at the center, said, “Sixteen percent of seniors get assessments [routinely]. Most probably never have. Now, there’s an issue with their finances. Now, the family is noticing. The person is living alone. There is mildewed food in the refrigerator. They can’t give themselves a proper diet…”
Wiley added, “We see a lot of people in crisis. But it is a slow decline. Most are not aware or not willing [to get tested]. If a test was more routine, like a check for cholesterol, then the person would get a diagnosis earlier. They could put in place a Power of Attorney, take care of finances, and get plans in place before there is a problem. We see a lot after the fact. What we want is awareness. We want to get the person in when the problem is first starting.”
In addition to making themselves available to test people who might be experiencing memory loss, they also are there for the families who act as caregivers. They offer a free 16 hour program to provide important information. It is a four day course.
“The Care Assistance Program experts volunteer to go over information with families, including disaster planning, when they start to wander … legal and financial planning is huge, care for the caregiver (you don’t want them to be burned out), living arrangements (some will require 24 hour assistance – nursing home and/or assisted living). We run three support groups here,” said Cedeno-Oblinger.
They offer their course 10 times per year. They have day and evening classes. The next one starts on Sept. 3 in the evening. After that, they have one on Sept. 16 during the day.
“[Partcipants] can share stories and realize they are not alone. A lot of others are suffering, grieving the loss of a spouse, [or parent],” said Wiley, who can see a change in the families who attend from feeling overwhelmed to feeling more empowered with information.
“Before they felt isolated. They leave empowered and feel their parent can age with dignity. We’re trying to put away the stigma. The [patients] need to be supported and included in the community rather than isolated. It is about how to create quality of life and keep them safe,” said Cedeno-Oblinger.
“It is very gratifying. We hear the thank yous. Patients come and bring their parents and later come back when they have an issue themselves to get the same great experience,” said Wiley, who said sometimes people come back and take the class again also because they need a refresher as their parents are in later stages.
“They didn’t have to listen to the later stage information because their parents were not at that stage yet, but now they are,” said Wiley.
She said there are things they can do to benefit patients, not only medication, but things like increasing socialization and mental activities. It could be getting them to read books or work on puzzles.
“If they’re sitting and staring at a TV, it’s not going to be helpful. Depression and dementia go hand-in-hand. Socialization is a big part of improving mood. In later stages, there are other behaviors [that emerge like] agitation, paranoia, wandering. It may limit their ability to go out. We can teach caregivers how to redirect patients,” said Wiley.
The center also offers other programs, including a safe driving assessment, which measures all aspects of what goes into driving – physical and mental. It also takes them through a road test and gives them a score that measure their risk to themselves and others for being on the road. If the test comes back saying they should probably not be driving, they can let families know of alternative transportation. The test has a fee but the counseling and also the memory screening is free.
The center, which has been around since 1986, is one of 16 of its kind in Florida. For more information, call 954-786-7392 or visit www.browardhealth.org/services/neurology.

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Exploring the cosmos with artist Carol Prusa

Posted on 31 August 2019 by LeslieM

Artist Carol Prusa stands in front of “Dark Light, Elegy for Rebecca Elson.”

By Rachel Galvin
Light and its absence are at the heart of Carol Prusa’s latest exhibit at the Boca Raton Museum of Art. What lies within the void is the question… what possibility lurks outside of the reach of mind’s eye? What was there before the beginning of the universe? Finding the answers to these questions certainly were within the mind of Prusa as she was creating her works with painstaking precision. Her artwork utilizes details, lines, shapes and symmetry to explore the abstract. Her “Dark Light” exhibition, which opened Aug. 20 and will be on display until Jan. 19, 2020, centers around her experiences of an eclipse.
“I got to experience the night during the day. The first was in Nebraska in 2017. It was so unsettling, so otherworldly. I had to try to grasp what I had just experienced. It knocked me backward. I had to lose my grounding. I had to try to express it the best way I could. I just went again in July 2019 to Chile. I had to see it again, to see if what I thought I saw, I saw,” said Prusa, who is now hoping to experience volcanoes. She has applied to do so at the Hawaii National Volcano Park, where they have just reopened residency.
When not creating works of art about the cosmos, she is reading about women who explored the cosmos in other ways, astronauts who have made vast discoveries, women like Maria Mitchell, who was not only the first female astronomer but the first scientist to discover a comet, among other accomplishments. Mitchell also seemed enamored with eclipses, as she led an all female expedition to Colorado in 1878 to observe one.
“I read a lot of cosmology and physics, big ideas that totally blow my mind,” said Prusa, adding that she likes to explore ideas like what was before the Big Bang, as well as string theory and more.
“It has to be that I don’t understand and then try to understand,” she said. “I need a catalyst to trigger …”
She added, “I love riding a bike at night. You think you see things. It is your mind buzzing, trying to fill the blanks. It is mind blowing. I think artists already are staring into darkness, scientists too.”
She was in Italy teaching drawing classes, and, while at the Uffizi Museum, she got to see drawings done with a process called Silverpoint, which she then began teaching her students and incorporated into her own work. She also uses graphite and acrylic working on plexiglass and wood panels. Some of her pieces in the museum exhibit are lit from within and one, called “Quintessence,” even has video, looking a bit like a kaleidoscope. The most imposing piece is a large scale work called “Dark Light, Elegy for Rebecca Elson,” who was a theoretical astrophysicist whose research focused on dark matter and who died of lymphoma.
With her “Cosmic Web (for the Harvard Observatory Computers)” piece, you feel like you are on the outside looking in.
She explained, “The perimeter is biological, a portal to the universe,” she said, adding that what looks a bit like brain matter around the edge was meant to look like “embryos before they are differentiated by gender. They are pure possibility.”
The “computers” of which she speaks are a group of female astronomers in the 1800s and 1900s who helped map the universe, including Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin.
She also has a series of smaller copperplate etchings honoring women astronomers, including Maria Mitchell, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Annie Jump Cannon, Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, Vera Rubin and Jocelyn Bell Burnell. The portfolio is called “Galaxias Kyklos,” which means “Milky Path” (or Milky Way) in Greek.
Kathleen Goncharov, the Senior Curator of the Museum, curated the exhibit. If it were up to Prusa, her pieces would be logical, perhaps chronological and certainly lined up. But the curator thought about it differently, said Prusa, looking more at the visual impact experienced by the viewer.
Executive Director Irvin Lippman feels the exhibit came together in the perfect way at the perfect time, being that it deals with the cosmos just in time for the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.
“How timely … with the eclipse with the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. It is a bit of serendipity. We are also keen in the educational department to talk about the value of STEAM (science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Math). Carol makes the best argument for arts and technology coming together. She is a brilliant example of the scientific mind and creativity coming together.”
He added, “The museum was founded by artists and it’s very important to continue to have exhibits that celebrate Florida artists. Carol has been so involved for many years judging juried shows, at the museum and art school. It is important to show her work.”
While looking over the collection of her artwork, Lippman said, “When you approach it, it’s so meditative. When an eclipse happens, everything else falls by the wayside. They last only a few moments, but, during those moments, everyone focuses together. [The center point of her pieces] draw you inside. [It has] almost meditative spots.”
This is the first solo show here for Prusa, but she has been involved in group shows here in the past, as well as elsewhere. She will be shown in the Norton Sculpture Garden next fall and has a show in Taipei in a couple of weeks. She is in many galleries and is represented in Asia, Canada, Europe and the United States.
She lives here in Boca Raton, but moved here in 1999 from the midwest after reading an article written by Bernice Steinbaum, who said that South Florida was the place to be for the art world.

“Cosmic Web (for the Harvard Observatory Computers)” by Carol Prusa. Submitted photo.

Asked if she felt that Steinbaum was correct, she said, “I felt more opportunity than in the midwest. There is more money to support art in South Florida. But it was more commercial than I understood … that was a transition. I think I have done well. I feel fortunate.”
Prusa wasn’t always an artist.
“I was the president of the math club and a chemistry major. I was happy. I met an artist at the University of Illinois. She thought in such a different way. I thought I could not become a complete person unless I studied art,” said Prusa, who received her Bachelor’s of Science from the University of Illinois and her Masters of Fine Art from Drake University.
She ended up obtaining a biomedical communications degree. She became a Medical Illustrator, which combines science and art. She was qualified to “make life masks, prosthetics, exhibition design, anatomy drawings” and more.
Her family was not so thrilled with her career path. She came from a very religious and iconoclast upbringing. Her father was a Calvinist, a head elder. She said she felt that tradition did give her “great rigor,” which she applied to her career, as she explored other ways of thinking than those she knew.
These days, Prusa does her work in her studio but it was not always the case.
“I used to work in my living room. Now, I have a 15 x 30 studio built in the backyard,” she said, saying she built the studio after winning the South Florida Cultural Consortium $15,000 top prize in 2003. She later received another consortium prize for $7500.
When working on her pieces, she likes to listen to NPR.
“It takes a piece of my mind away so my mind can be more Zen. The judgmental and critical mind drops away and is given over to NPR.”
When not working on her works of art, Prusa is a professor at the Florida Atlantic University teaching all levels of painting for undergraduate and graduate level. She has worked there for 19 years, but worked for 18 years prior teaching at Iowa State University. She has a husband and two children.
The Boca Raton Museum of Art is located within Mizner Park at 501 Plaza Real in Boca Raton. For more information on the museum, visit www.bocamuseum.org or call 561-392-2500. For more information on the artist, visit www.carolprusa.com.

Guests attend opening of the “Dark Light” exhibit on Aug. 20.

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Caribbean Princess caters to kids With new Reef Splash Zone & more

Posted on 11 July 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Cruising is supposed to be a relaxing experience and, for parents, having an opportunity to keep the little ones busy adds a bit more joy to their journey. The Caribbean Princess cruise liner took this into account when they installed a new Reef Splash Zone on their Deck 17. This area is really a lot of fun. Kids can walk in the water, splash around, squirt their friends with water or go down a mini slide. They can stand beneath some of the water shower features while waiting for the whale feature to burst rain from its spout. It is a whimsical addition, perfect for a tropical adventure. They also added new seating options and outdoor games like Connect 4, Jenga and Cornhole. Their outdoor bar serves up both cocktails and mocktails to quench your thirst. These are just a few of the new features on the ship. They made additional refurbishments overall.

They also have indoor fun for kids. There are several rooms that are part of Camp Discovery. Each room is a little different and accommodates different age groups.

One of the rooms has a water table with different iconic landmarks from around the globe, allowing kids to interact and learn. The kids can engage in planned activities as well – arts & crafts and more. Other rooms have games like air hockey, foosball, PS 4 games and other features.

In addition, kids can play a game or go on a scavenger hunt around the ship using their OceanMedallion™ — a technological wonder. This quarter-like object can be worn as a clip, on a band, on a bracelet or as a pendant. It seems like magic… It can be used to do everything from open your door to locate your friends and family on the ship. You can stream your favorite shows with great WiFi or order food from wherever you are. These are just a few options.

Of course, the whole ship is at your disposal and one of the options you will want to partake in with the whole family is watching the poolside movies or enjoying stargazing. There is so much fun to choose from while you enjoy your ocean trip. Bon Voyage!

To find out more about Princess Cruises, visit www.princess.com.

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Traveling to London

Posted on 11 July 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Thinking of getting away sometime soon? Why not hop across the pond to merry ol’ England like I recently did. If you have never been there, you may be in for a surprise. London is a bustling urban scene. It feels much like New York with Washington D.C. mixed in, and the people are nicer. With tourism season starting, this place is a madhouse with people crowding the streets in many areas.

There are so many things to see in the London area. Everywhere you turn, there is a historical monument, statue or plaque. Plus, there is a huge amount of construction. All those historical buildings need maintaining, and they are building more. The Big Ben was completely under scaffolding minus the clock face. (Big Ben is not the actual name of the clock. It is the bell!) It is called the Westminster Clock because that is the borough it is in. (The Westminster area is a great place to stay as many things are in walking distance).

If you get tired of walking, jump on a Hop On, Hop Off Bus and get a tour and a lift at the same time. Double Decker buses are everywhere.

Most choose the subway. The subway stations are huge and involve a lot of walking and stairs (some elevators are available). Even going down a 15 story escalator can be daunting. To get the best deal, buy a refillable Oyster Card. The subway route can be confusing but ask an employee and they will steer you in the right direction. If you are going longer distances, grab a train, a coach or take a boat ride on the Thames.

So what should you do while there? Here are a few choices:

Westminster Abbey — Consecrated in 1065 by Edward the Confessor, this huge structure has seen multiple renovations through the years. On one side, there are statues of martyrs from the 20th Century, including Martin Luther King, Jr. Inside, 17 monarchs have been buried inside, including, Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots, next to each other, and so many others, from Charles Dickens to Stephen Hawking. One of the most prized possessions here is the original throne of Edward the Confessor. FYI: They don’t allow you to take pictures inside.

St. Paul’s Cathedral — This is where Princess Di and Prince Charles got married. It is stunningly beautiful. Diana’s train was made so long in order to “fill the space” in the enormous church. Grab a cup of tea at the nearby cafe in the courtyard.

Buckingham Palace — The palace with 775 rooms is certainly worth seeing. It is usually open to the public from the end of July to September. Many rush to see the Changing of the Guard, but you may be underwhelmed. The crowds are intense and being able to get close to the action is difficult.

Parliament — The tour is very informative. You can learn a lot about the government and history. It is a lot to absorb. Many areas do not allow pictures.

Tower of London — Save yourself plenty of time to go here because it is not just one tower; it is many. It can involve a lot of steep winding stairs and long lines to see key areas like the crown jewels. Make sure to take a picture of the wonderful ravens. The White Tower is filled with shields, swords, armor and artillery. But there are plenty of other towers to explore. Eat nearby at the Hung, Drawn & Quartered. There is a great church nearby too called All Hallows by the Tower, founded in 675 AD.

The Globe Theatre — Fans of the bard will want to go to the recreation of the theater that once was the setting for Shakespeare’s classic plays. It is fairly cheap to get a tour and you can also buy tickets for performances here.

The Shard — This skyscraper is 95 stories. There is a charge to go to the top, but they have several restaurants you can visit for free. Grab a bite to eat and get an amazing view from the top of the world. Restaurants tend to be on the pricier side. This is a good time to get dressed up. Bring your camera and go during the day for the best views. FYI: Right now, sunset is about 9:30 p.m. So you have plenty of daylight.

The London Eye — This huge Ferris wheel offers another great view for a 30 pound price (40 pounds for fast track past the lines). There are 32 capsules, one for each borough in London.

Harrods — A must-do, this store is huge. They have anything you could want here, including amazing high end fashions and a to-die-for food section with chocolates, pastries, mushrooms, truffles, caviar, meats, fish, breads, you name it… as well as a great selection of teas, of course. They also offer tea time in the store and have various options available. They do have a dress code. (Another great place for shopping is Oxford Street, as well as Picadilly Circus and Trafalgar Square).

Museums — There are so many museums in London and many of them are free! The National Gallery is a gem with pretty much every artist you can think of from Leonardo Da Vinci to Monet and more. If you prefer modern art, head to the Tate Modern. Go to the 6th floor for a great view of the Thames! There are also science and history museums. The British Museum, filled with Egyptian statues and other antiquities, has a great gift shop and café area.

Markets — There are some great markets here, including the Borough Market, where they have jellies, cheeses, wines, tea, pastries, cookies, fudge, seafood, sausages, curries and more. Next door are so many places to walk up and buy cooked food too. Good luck finding a chair though and it is quite crowded. But there are plenty of samples. Covenant Garden’s Apple Market has handmade clothing and crafts. There are many great shops and restaurants nearby, including the Benjamin Pollock’s Toyshop, a small store that has been around over 100 years (Also, find Hamley’s seven-story Toy Store on Regent Street).

Parks — There are so many great small and huge parks here like Hyde Park and St. James Park. Huge pelicans, ducks, geese and pelicans abound, as well as beautiful trees, lush green grass and gardens.

International foods — There are many different food options here. Most pubs are centered around fish and chips, and meat or chickpea pies, it seems, which are tasty, but there are plenty of restaurants that offer global fare, from Italian to Middle Eastern. There is even a Chinatown. The Indian food is out of this world! If you like dessert, try the delicious sticky toffee pudding.

Outside of London

There are so many great spots around London that did not even get mentioned here. A short drive away and you can visit a castle, head to Stratford Upon Avon to see where Shakespeare grew up, see the majestic architecture of Oxford, where there are 39 colleges, and much more. Families must go to the Warner Brothers Studio to see where Harry Potter was filmed. I spent four hours and it was not enough. Adults will really enjoy this too as it is more informational than anything else. You learn about every aspect of making the movie – props, sets, costumes and plenty of secrets. There are interactive components to add to the fun for kids too. Make sure to get a Butter Beer! It tastes like butterscotch soda with some sort of whip cream on top.

Spending time in London was a dream come true and we packed a lot of sightseeing into nine days, but there was so much more to see. I can totally understand the sentiment of Samuel Johnson, the writer of the first dictionary, who famously said, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.”

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Phat Boy Sushi & Kitchen

Posted on 11 April 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Sometimes, you don’t need all the flair… you just want things simple. Phat Boy Sushi & Kitchen lives by that philosophy. Much like a Ying & Yang symbol, the aesthetics of their newest restaurant located in Deerfield Beach is based on black and white, with large scale muted geisha paintings adding a sense of harmony and authenticity.

Phat Boy Sushi & Kitchen works to be as genuine as possible in its Japanese selections as it offers up a large variety of not only sushi and sashimi, but plenty of choices straight from the kitchen as well. For a perfect beginning, try their delicious Banging Shrimp which is jumbo shrimp battered in tempura and served covered in a mildly spicy mayo topped with scallions.

One of their more popular dishes is their Mushroom Tobanyaki, which is a pretty big size for an appetizer. It consists of three different type of mushrooms sauteed in a rich soy sake sauce with a touch of butter, although the buttery flavor is obvious throughout.

Always popular is their ramens. They have several types. This reporter tried the Tonkotsu Ramen and it was huge. (They definitely allow for sharing and will separate dishes into bowls ahead of time). The large bowl was filled with a salty and creamy pork broth. Inside was a six minute egg, shitake mushrooms, caramelized and tender slices of marinated pork belly, scallions, bean sprouts, seaweed and onions. Digging into the bottom unveiled the egg noodles just waiting to be discovered.

They have yakitori, seafood selections, salads, rice, stir fry and more. If you don’t like raw fish, you can order a California Roll, for example, which has cooked crab. For $3.50 more, you can upcharge to real (not imitation) King Crab, which is delicious and sweet. On the menu are the desserts — with traditional selections like mochi ice cream and more unconventional ones too. Their most popular is fried oreo.

“We cater to those who eat sushi and kitchen food. We serve our food tapas style, geared toward sharing,” said manager Breyden Haessig.

They also have a bar with beer, wine and sake. There is a “reverse happy hour” from 10:30 p.m. until close. They offer draft beer for $2.50 and bottomless hot sake for $10.

The restaurant is open seven days a week 11:30 a.m. to midnight.

Owner John Maser said he has wanted to create food since he was young.

“I enjoy people’s smiles because they like my food,” said Maser. “I have always wanted to do this since I was a kid. Sushi can be much more artistic. I can make it more beautiful.”

“This is our third location,” said Haessig. “The first one was in Oakland Park for three years. We also have a location in downtown Ft. Lauderdale which has been open for a year. We opened here before the first of the year.”

He said the restaurant caters to people’s needs.

“A lot of places say no substitutes [We will customize for you]. Tell us what you want. We want people to come and leave happy,” he said.

Phat Boy Sushi & Kitchen is located at 949 S. Federal Hwy. For more information, call 754-227-5489 or visit www.phatboysushi.com.

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Prezzo is back

Posted on 14 March 2019 by LeslieM

With a new chef and healthier options

By Rachel Galvin

If you travel into Boca Raton just north of Yamato on Military Trail, you will find a very interesting shopping locale called Park Place, which opened two years ago but may still be unknown to many. The open air feel and fresh modern architecture are quite inviting. Within this shopping oasis, you will find several eateries, including Prezzo, which opened a little over a year ago. If that name sounds familiar, it should. You may remember Prezzo from years ago. It became a popular hotspot after originally opening in west Boca in 1989 bringing with it one of the first wood burning pizza ovens to South Florida.

Executive Chef Patrick Delay just started with Prezzo back in August. This up-and-coming chef was nominated for the Eater 2019 Young Guns award (the winner will be announced this summer) and is the youngest in the restaurant group, which includes Max’s Grill in Mizner Park, as well as Deck 84 and Burt & Max’s in Delray.

He has recently added some new items to his menu to accommodate those seeking healthier options. His veggie forward focus includes vegetable lasagna made with butternut squash noodles and other hearty, but healthy, ingredients. They also have zucchini noodles. Many items are easily made gluten free upon request.

A must-try is the Quinoa & Squash Salad — a light but filling option. Roasted chicken lays atop quinoa and arugula, mixed with pieces of roasted butternut squash and zucchini, sprinkled with dried cranberries with added pumpkin seeds for texture, made with balsamic vinaigrette.

A nice traditional entrée with a healthier spin is their chicken marsala. Rich with flavor, the chicken falls apart easily with a fork and pairs nicely with cauliflower cous cous, which serves as a great alternate base for the dish, and savory mushrooms.

Seeking comfort food? An option like baked rigatoni, which has a pop of flavor with its added crumbled Italian sausage, is a nice choice. It also has broccoli, red pepper flakes and parmesan cream.

They also have chicken, pork, seafood, pasta, pizza and more, so there is plenty to eat. Many items have carried over from the original Prezzo, like their fusilli pasta, roasted garlic breadsticks and their wood oven-baked apple tart, which makes for a nice light dessert (The best part is the cinnamon gelato on top).

There are plenty of specials here, including a 12 for $12 menu (including a beverage) Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and a half priced happy hour daily from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.— buy one entrée, get the second one half off.

There is a full bar with a happy hour from 12 to 6 p.m. (from any seat in the restaurant) with wine by the glass specials and ½ priced beer and spirits. Enjoy live music on Thursdays from 8 to 9:30 p.m. on the outdoor patio. This is a great spot for a date night or family outing.

Prezzo is located at 5560 N Military Tr., #300, in Boca Raton. For more information, visit www.prezzoboca.com.

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Famed designer/author Hutton Wilkinson visits Boca Raton

Posted on 04 March 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

Famed interior designer, jewelry designer and author Hutton Wilkinson left California to pay a visit to South Florida. First, on Jan. 31, he went to the newly opened Jay Feder Jewelers (at 6859 SW 18 St. in Boca Raton) (www.jayfeder.com/bocaraton), where a party was held as he launched his Tony Duquette Jewelry Collection in style. The following day, he went to the Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum to present his newest book, “Tony Duquette Dawnridge.”

Guests were delighted to hear stories about how his once-partner designer Tony Duquette got his start and about his famous home. The home was built in 1949 by Tony and his wife Elizabeth. It was a simple structure — 30 x 30. But the home he created would become the go-to place for many of the Hollywood set, including Fred Astaire, Marion Davies, Loretta Young, Arthur Freed and Mary Pickford, among others. Tony had some luxurious parties in his home, complete with everything from Indian dancers to Chinese acrobats, bringing an exotic flair. When not living in the home, they rented it out to famous tenants like Marlon Brando and Eva Gabor. They soon bought the home next to Dawnridge, which they also rented out, but it burnt down in 1974. When the home was torn down, they used the land to create beautiful garden terraces. The expansion of Dawnridge would continue. The home — its interior and exterior — looked like a faraway land, like Japan, Austria or South Asia rather than Beverly Hills and it was used for many fashion shoots as well. The couple also bought other properties.

Hutton worked with Tony and, after Tony and his wife’s passing, he and his wife Ruth decided to purchase the home and to remodel it. Today, Hutton maintains the home and continues to run the jewelry company that he had with Tony.

People can now purchase his “Dawnridge” book, with its 256 pages and 300 color illustrations, and see the transformation of the home through the years and read more about its history.

For more information on the book, visit https://tonyduquette.com/tony-duquettes-dawnridge.

For more information on the Boca Raton Historical Society, visit www.bocahistory.org.

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And Fish Kitchen + Bar opens

Posted on 23 February 2019 by LeslieM

By Rachel Galvin

On Feb. 7, a new restaurant opened on Pompano Beach called And Fish Kitchen + Bar. It can be found within the Ft. Lauderdale Marriott Pompano Beach Resort & Spa (at 1200 N. Ocean Blvd) just steps from their large outdoor pool (where they have another more casual dining restaurant). The interior design of this new locale was created by Bigtime Design Studios of Miami and it gives a nod to the nautical. Guests can try their modern cuisine with an emphasis on seafood or grab one of their specialty crafted cocktails from the open bar. They have a happy hour from 3 to 7 p.m.

For the grand opening party that night, they removed most of the 115 seats to make room for guests, who mingled and enjoyed some free cocktails, as well as passed hors d’ oeuvres. Other guests did a little dancing at the end of the evening, after posing for photos with an ice sculpture, which had seafood like octopus embedded within it. It was a real community event filled with media personalities, business people and food lovers. They also did a ribbon cutting and gave $3000 to the Shipwreck Park Foundation.

And Fish Kitchen + Bar accepts reservations. Call 954-944-9515 or visit www.opentable.com.

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